Deutsch

“Rarest of All Hunting Sets by Ridinger”

J. Halle, Munich 1928, LXVIII/323

Ridinger, Ways to Trap/Title

Here then 23 of 30 Sheets
of the
Instructive Set

To trap the Wild Animals

“ A rare set ,
of importance to those who are interested in
the various methods of trapping wild animals ”

Schwerdt, Hunting Hawking Shooting, 1928

“ ‘The Ways to trap the Wild Animals’ belong to the chief works among Ridinger’s representations of the hunt … here, too, extensive captions are added to the plates which elucidate the depiction … This – typical for Ridinger –

combination of high-quality work of art and … text

should be a reason for the great success of his works ”

(Stefan Morét, Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, pp. 106 f., erroneously stating 31 sheet as belonging to).

Created by Johann Elias Ridinger throughout and – except for eight etched by his eldest, Martin Elias – transferred by himself, too, into copper in oblong format of c. 9⅞ × 14⅛ in (25 × 36 cm), the plate inscriptions accordingly vary Joh. El. Ridinger inv. del. et excud. Aug. Vind. and Joh. El. Ridinger inv. del. sculps. et excud. Aug. Vind. / Mart. E. Ridinger sculps. Aug. Vind. resp. The inscriptions of the sheets with the address of Martin Engelbrecht addressed specifically hereinafter cited with the respective sheets.

Coppenrath (1889/90) owned two copies, each with several sheets in later impressions, plus a 19-sheet bundle. Interspersed with new impressions, too, the copies of the Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX (1885) & Th. Reich auf Biehla (Boerner LV [1894]). In the George Hamminger Collection (Helbing XXXV [1895]) one not quite uniform copy each in old and new impressions resp., besides various bundles and individual sheets frequently interspersed with new prints. In Helbing’s monumental offer Arbeiten von J. E. und M. E. Ridinger (catalog XXXIV [1900], 1554 lots) the set as a whole missing, with five sheets even still missing among the indeed numerous individual sheets, in Halle’s stock catalog of 1928 only one with but 29 plates not quite complete copy. Schwerdt owned the complete set, Baillie-Grohman only in slightly later prints (1824/25?), three of which trimmed to the subject and apparently with caption (see below) throughout. 1958 on the Faber-Castell sale finally within an omnibus volume just 24 sheet of the set, those missing – including all four Engelbrecht sheets, see below – separately in individual sheets at least.

Of the 23 sheet now presented here three are available here for the first time, others traded last decades ago.

Present not least those particularly rare four sheets , too ,

with the address of Martin Engelbrecht (1684-1756) ,

the enigma of which probably will never be solved conclusively .

Usually they show up without caption which, however, was known to Thienemann via Weigel and

for Th. 91 , The Badger captured with the Turnpike ,

Ridinger, Badger captured with Turnpike (caption)

is confirmed , too , per the original copper printing plate present here ,

yet at the same time deviates from the other sheets of the set by both its brevity and stylistically and Ridinger’s inscription with Latinized “I” as documented only rarely and then for supposedly mostly early works, partly not yet etched by himself. Whereas Engelbrecht’s “published at” instead of the usual “excudit” rather suggests the period after Ridinger when about 1824/25 a new edition was published by Engelbrecht-Hertzberg. Where the set of the Ways to trap the Wild Animals totaled only 28 sheet anymore though.

However, said sheets occur in throughout fine printing quality — which again and again and especially in the absence of deeper knowledge gave rise to qualifications like “before the letter” or “early impression” — almost always on laid paper while aforesaid new edition was printed on cloudy vélin (watermarks Thurneisen or Oeser Basel). Not forgetting, too, that the even rarer set Great Gentlemen’s Pleasure in Various Hunts, still engraved by third party, Th. 1-8, as Ridinger’s earliest hunting set had been published about 1722 by Engelbrecht. All in all thus quite imaginable

that these four plates actually are from Ridinger’s early period ,

that is between c. 1724 and 1728 as the first appearance of his inscription as etcher/engraver, too (“sculps. Aqua forti”, so Th. 793-802), until 1728 still for third parties. If with or still without caption has to remain undecided just as Engelbrecht’s part in it. Otherwise hypotheses only. For of little help, too, lots 7A (without comment “old impressions”) & 7B (“… in later impressions where with … the caption has been covered, and these bear Engelbrecht’s address”) in Weigel’s Art Stock Catalog, pt. XXVIII (1857), Ridinger appendix. According to which within the complete set 7A the four sheets in question showed the caption — yet why then are they that rare? — , albeit not within 7B anymore. If this should have been added subsequently only, which is supported by aforesaid brevity & style, then why should it have been covered immediately? For if in the end it had proven as interfering, how much more so then in its covered state. But also Weigel’s 7B attribution as later prints cannot convince if with regard to paper and print of indeed the contemporary quality documented afore. It also could be vice versa:

7B with the caption erroneously stated as covered, yet missing indeed, would be the first or A edition, in analogy to the usual occurrence as “without caption”. 7A, however, would be the later B edition in which the text had been added by a different hand. Which, however, did not see, as not unusual, a wide circulation and thus elevated the four sheet in question with the text to almost uniques. Remains to be seen how in case of a copy certified for the new edition of 1824/25 its four aberrants present themselves. So far it thus remains à la Fontane — “… this really is too vast a field” — and the realities of the presently available may speak for themselves.

“ Belongs to the Finest Engravings of German Rococo ”

L’Art Ancien 1938

Ridinger, Ways to Trap/Title

Only Rarely Captured —
The Constructive Title Sheet

Representations designed from Nature How all Big and Small Game, along with the Winged Game is trapped alive or dead in various manner with Reason Artifice and Force! Inscribed in German: All drawn from life and published by Johann Elias Ridinger in Augspurg in the year 1750. May. 10th, otherwise as before along with 8 lines explanation in German. – Thienemann & Schwarz (vol. I, plate V & ill. p. 69) 69; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.9 with ills.; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 27. – The wide white margin partially minimally foxing.

Offer no. 15,848 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

The Hay Sheds or Winter Feeding for the Red Deer. “We see here on an open spot in the woods a large hay shed with fence, that the stags which are assembled numerously within and about can leap over” (Th.). – Thienemann 70; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 29. – Not in the 1999 Ridinger catalog Darmstadt. – 1.1-1.5 cm paper margin around with itself about ½ cm wide white platemark. – Corner lower left faintly age-spotted with the far edges reinforced by old.

“ Just as the stags slim a lot by the rut … that in hard frost and lots of snow many would fall as they shall be helped by the hay sheds or racks and they be fed within … in this manner those deer are helped well in hard winter and they will visit these hay barns a lot as long the frost lasts once thaw sets in they move away by themselves, However, I have seen that on 4. sides of this barn a gun shot afar small lodges from wood stood from whence the forester not only can examine the number and strength of the deer but also as necessary for the kitchen can stalk something … ”

Offer no. 16,143 / sold

Ridinger, Stalking Red Deer

“ He even shall take off the Shoes ”

How the High Game is stalked by sneaking on the Pasture. Behind a tree the huntsman, the shoes bound at his back and the leash at the belt, leveling at a stag of about 16 points. – Thienemann 71; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 28 with ill. – Not in the 1999 Ridinger catalog Darmstadt. – 1.1-1.4 cm paper margin around with itself about ½ cm wide white platemark. – Corner lower left with touch of age spottedness.

“ When the hunter enquired where the red or high deer takes the pasture he moves taking his scenthound with him to the woods before daybreak … he takes care of the place and sees to get at the game from the side that he has the wind against himself so that the game may not get the scent of him … as long now the game takes the pasture he may advance confidently but carefully, yet if such raises the head or even is heard the hunter shall stand motionless at once … if he is that close that he can shoot soon he even shall take off the shoes so that he treads not so heavily or snaps something by the sound of which the game might become fleeting … from signing and the blood the hunter can judge if the shot is deadly … ”

Offer no. 16,144 / EUR  585. / export price EUR  556. (c. US$ 643.) + shipping

Ridinger, Entrance of a Deer Park

The entrance of a Deer Park with two Automatic Doors. In dense wood a clearing edged with palisades, through the door mechanism of which a Two-Year-Old Stag leaps in. Front right and on the left below trees four deer. – Thienemann 73. – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997). – Margins on three sides 4.8-7.2 cm wide, on the left fine margin of 3 mm outside the white platemark of 5 mm. – Various smaller tears in the slightly creased white far edge below backed acid-freely.

“ The high entrances are not always installed with advantage and with this manner the deer will misjump less … the openings of the doors of which there may be several are set up in those places where one finds the most traces, however, several piece game are kept in this garden which the stags scent especially in rutting season, if now a stag moves along the planks on the outside … and comes to the outer door a. which stands open at all times and hears game so he goes in through the covered opening c. in the midst of this alley a brass wire … is run across … if the stag now touches this wire so … the drawstrings of the outer and inner door get by the attached weight that they pull the doors a. outside shut and b. inside open … a diligent hunter reconnoiters the entrances has something got trapped then the inward door is closed the outward one opened anew … so everything is in order for a new capture … ”

Offer no. 16,145 / EUR  590. / export price EUR  561. (c. US$ 649.) + shipping

Ridinger, Stags in a Deer Park

“ This Manner
of Satisfaction of the Hunting Pleasure
most likely agrees
with the Love for Laziness ”

(How the Deer are stalked in a Deer Park.) In spacious, multifariously staged and most richly enacted grounds the two huntsmen behind their overgrown artificial wall with openings. Inscribed: I. El. Ridinger inv. del. & sculp. / verlegt in Augsburg bey Martin Engelbrecht.

Thienemann 74; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX, within 1787 (in “newer impression” only, 1885!); George Hamminger collection within 1529 (with the text, see below) & 1530 (new impressions). – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997). – One of the five plates missing with Helbing, cat. XXXIV, Arbeiten v. J. E. u. M. E. Ridinger, (1900), as individual sheet, too. – Marvelous impression of rich chiaroscuro with 3-4, above 2.5 cm margin around on the prime-quality cloudy paper known for old though somewhat later impressions. – The caption according to Thienemann may be:

Below trimmed within the still 13 mm wide white platemark. Otherwise with fine margin around the here c. 8 mm wide white platemark.

“ This manner of satisfaction of the hunting pleasure most likely agrees with the love for laziness … At the main rendezvous of the deer there are walls furnished with openings … In this ambush the hunter lies himself, chooses with all comfort the wanted piece deer … ”

One of the four mysterious sheets of the Ways to trap

(& Th. 75, 89, 91) which bear the address of Martin Engelbrecht (1684-1756, the equal-named publishing house till 1827) in Augsburg already from early on and with exception of Thienemann & Schwarz as well as for Th. 74 & 91 also with Hamminger are known only in impressions without the explanatory caption.

Offer no. 14,667 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

– The same, but on firm laid paper with typographic watermark and trimmed below within the still 13 mm wide white platemark. Otherwise with fine margin around the here c. 8 mm wide white platemark.

Offer no. 16,146 / EUR  585. / export price EUR  556. (c. US$ 643.) + shipping

Ridinger, Stag in Turn-iron

“ A Method of Hunting which is not likely to belong to the Noble Pleasure of Hunting ”

The Stag caught in the Turn-iron. Stag of 12 points in thick forest part. Inscribed: I. El. Ridinger inv. del. & sculp. / verlegt in Augsburg bey Martin Engelbrecht.

Thienemann & Schwarz 75; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX, within 1787 (in “newer impression” only, 1885!); Reich auf Biehla Collection within 15 (in “new impression” only, 1894!); Hamminger Collection within item 1529 (“Exceedingly rare! ”, 1895) & 1530 (new impressions). – Marvelous impression of vibrant chiaroscuro with 3-4, above 2.5 cm margin around differingly on the prime-quality cloudy paper known for old though somewhat later impressions and like the above belonging to those four mysterious sheets of the Ways to trap the Wild Animals. – The caption according to Thienemann may be:

“ In previous times one had attempted to captivate even the red deer in the covert of his retreat by comon turn irons of proportionate size covered under leafage; a manner of hunting which is not likely to belong to the noble pleasure of hunting. The representation shows such a miserable prisoner who groans under the pains his smashed foreleg causes him. ”

Offer no. 14,666 / EUR  560. / export price EUR  532. (c. US$ 615.) + shipping

Ridinger, Spring-gun on a Bear

Moocher grabbing for someone else’s Honey

Spring-Gun on a Bear. The bear, stretched up high, reaching in strained expectation for the honey-pot buzzed about by innumerable bees and licking the golden juice running freely, in the moment of the shots coming off from two sides. – Thienemann 76; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.11 with ills.; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 31. – A larger-sized variant in drawing, yet compared with the print “quite different in the execution” and also proper 6-lined caption at Th., page 274, c. – Wide-margined, with watermark WANGEN as one of the papers preferred by Ridinger. – Available here both the original printing-plate in the shine of its centuries-old copper and the richly washed original drawing in the same direction as the engraving from the small group of the master’s bewitchingly beautiful painterlies.

“ … little by little a fence is made from planks which directs the bear to a certain place there at the same time an elevation should be created there little by little, too, this place one has to bait once in a while that the bears get to know and visit the same … athwart the rise a beam should run … if one now … has heard that the place is visited … so at the beam running athwart a pot with honey is hung … ”

Offer no. 15,846 / EUR  530. / export price EUR  504. (c. US$ 583.) + shipping

Ridinger, Shooting Cabin at Bear Garden

The Elevated Shooting Cabin at a Bear Garden. “In the foreground a dead horse, into the neck of which a young bear has locked, while the other already lies killed before the horse carrion and the mother is just shot down (from two barrels) from the cabin” (Th.), while a third hunter peeks through the door. And suggestively a dead trunk with further bait looms tilted from the left to the center. – Thienemann 77; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.12 with ill.; Stubbe, Die Jagd in der Kunst – Johann Elias Ridinger, 1966, plate 9. – Not in the 1997 Ridinger catalog Kielce. – Margins on three sides 3.2-4 cm wide, on the left with 1 cm plus the 5 mm wide white platemark more narrow-edged. Here besides narrow cut-out 8 cm long touching the lower corner of the platemark. – Fine impression.

“ Where bears are located at such places bear gardens are set up … just opposite to the opening a cabin furnished with shooting holes … around the same including the posts a deep pit is dug also arm the posts with peaked iron so that the bears cannot come up at these, into the cabin the hunter climbs on a ladder and takes the same up after he has barred the small entrance together with the firing holes well so that the bears won’t get wind of him, but he yet has small openings … as he then can be shot with pleasure by the huntsmen watching in the cabin. ”

Offer no. 16,147 / EUR  595. / export price EUR  565. (c. US$ 653.) + shipping

Ridinger, Turnpike for a Lynx

Turnpike set up for a Lynx! Moonlit rock grotto with the lynx just ready to leap at the dead bird hanging at the cord. – Thienemann 82; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.15 with ill.; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 35. – C. 1 cm wide margin around in addition to the 5 mm wide white platemark. – Lower left small completed tear in the white paper margin.

“ When one notices the lynxes’ and wolves’ runs and traces, so in the mountains and woods on narrow paths such turnpikes are set up for them in the following manner … When now the beast of prey after everything has been weathered well also the by-passes have been denied comes to pull off the bait … so the setup springs off and the same has its neck or back broken by the punch bar and without suffering injury of its skin … ”

Offer no. 16,142 / EUR  449. / export price EUR  427. (c. US$ 494.) + shipping

Ridinger, Pike for Cat/Marten

Drilling Pike for a wild Cat or Marten. The mighty trap set up in thick forest at springe steps with a greedily grabbing he-cat and detailed A-H. – Thienemann 83; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.16 with ill. – Not in the 1997 Ridinger catalog Kielce. – Splendid, wide-margined impression of this as constructive as atmospheric sheet.

“ Where one sets springes for fieldfare, snipes and other winged game in the narrow wood paths … there quite soon come martens, foxes and wildcats … and take the catched birds

whereby then the hunter goes short .

To ease this as also to capture these carnivores … ”

Offer no. 15,850 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

– The same in fine impression with margins 5-8 mm wide around in addition to the 1 cm wide white platemark.

Offer no. 16,148 / EUR  595. / export price EUR  565. (c. US$ 653.) + shipping

Ridinger, Wolf with Duck on the Disc

“ … and has to give up himself in the Pit ”

How the Wolf is brought onto the disc by the Duck and catched in the Pit. In thick wood scenery from the right a wolf leaps for the duck bound to the now dipping disc. Above of this at a branch a bait, far right a second wolf. – Thienemann 84; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.17 with ill.; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 36; Stubbe, Die Jagd in der Kunst – Johann Elias Ridinger, 1966, plate 10. – Splendid, wide-margined impression.

“ The wolf pit shall be set up at places where neither humans nor other, particularly big game get very easily … however, these pits shall be deep 12 to 14 foot and in diameter if they are round 8 to 9 foot … besides the pit has to be well served with smoothed thick boards on the ground and those sides so that the wolf finds no purchase in leaping up nor finds occasion to dig himself through, onto this pit … a disc closely woven from wattles can be set into equilibrium … when one notices that the wolf has taken the bait, so one may bind a living goose or lamb onto the disc, finds he such a juicy morsel he will do a pounce at it, immediately the disc turns that he drops and has to give up himself in the pit. ”

Offer no. 15,851 / EUR  560. / export price EUR  532. (c. US$ 615.) + shipping

– The same in fine impression with margins on three sides 3.3-4.3 cm wide, on the left with 0.8-1 cm plus the 9 mm wide white platemark more narrow-edged. The lower left corner besides with narrow diagonal cut-off 7 cm long.

Offer no. 16,149 / EUR  510. / export price EUR  485. (c. US$ 561.) + shipping

« It takes quite a lot of artistic intelligence

to achieve this as delicate as animating effect of light.

With it, if he knows to handle it,

the engraver possesses a decisive medium

for one of the most essential effects

the art of engraving can actually obtain »

Wolf Stubbe, Johann Elias Ridinger, 1966, pp. 16 f.

Ridinger, Wolf in Iron Trap

The Wolf in the Iron Trap. The iron mounted on a chain strangling the neck. In the background clearing edged by palisades. – Thienemann 85; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 37. – Not in the 1999 Ridinger catalog Darmstadt. – Margins on three sides 12 mm, below 4 mm wide in addition to the white platemark of 5 mm. – Two pleats originating from printing still extending into the subject perceptible in outline within the caption only. – At/close to the lower left corner small restored tears in the white paper margin.

“ If wolves are traced so first bait … is dragged, if one is certain that the wolf has been at the drag the iron is set in a place where the wolf passes or trots otherwise it is handled as following … if now the wolf got at the bait towards the iron and wants to take away the lure itself, too, so both frames go off and … as lightning turn upwards … also the iron should be fastened on a chain e. else it might happen if the wolf has trapped himself with one leg only he would carry away the same. ”

Offer no. 16,150 / EUR  445. / export price EUR  423. (c. US$ 489.) + shipping

Ridinger, Plank Trap for Fox

Plank Trap for a Fox on the Pit.Thienemann 86; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, III.18 with ill. – Not in the 1997 Ridinger catalog Kielce. – Warm-toned impression.

“ In places where one notices that foxes keep their exits and entrances a pit 3. ells or deeper is dug, in the diameter as big as the fox cannot leap over it from the seesaw plank … then the seesaw plank is mounted to a hinge which goes easily, more weight kept behind but just as much that as soon the fox passes over the hinge, and comes to snatch the live or dead bird … fastened on the plank, the plank quickly falls down by the overweight gotten from him hence the fox is forced to fall into the pit where one can have him alive or dead … old foxes frequently take the bait up to the trap and yet won’t go onto it, for these one shall place a fine morsel up front and … fasten the trap has he succeeded once or twice as can be seen by the removed bait so the third time he will come for certain … ”

Offer no. 28,008 / EUR  562. / export price EUR  534. (c. US$ 617.) + shipping

– The same, yet evenly slightly browned and trimmed up to the edge of the subject/caption. Within the text at the lower left corner tiny hole backed acid-freely. In such a manner quite age-marked, however, with mat pictorially acceptable. – In the white field right off the title Cyrillic (?) inscription in bister of old.

Offer no. 16,151 / EUR  190. (c. US$ 220.) + shipping

Ridinger, Break Trap for Fox

The Far Rarer One of the Two Fox Traps

Break Trap set for a Fox. The mighty trap detailed A-K in adequately original ambience. – Thienemann 87; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 38 with ill. – Not in the 1999 Ridinger catalog Darmstadt. – Splendid, wide-margined impression.

“ When one is certified that a fox or badger occupies an earth, which one cannot get by digging out of the same and those laid irons, so this kind of traps is one of the most proven, its structure shows by itself how they are made and prepared, however, the following has to be noted … ”

Angebots-Nr. 15.845 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

– The same in fine impression with narrow diagonal cut-off of 7 cm in the white margin at the lower left corner. Margins above and on the right 4.6-4.9, on the left and below 1.2-3.3 cm wide.

Offer no. 16,152 / EUR  570. / export price EUR  542. (c. US$ 627.) + shipping

Ridinger, Fox/Badger in Wire Snare

How to capture a Fox or Badger with the Wire Snare. On a clearing before the exit of his earth blocked sideways with pegs “Reynard hangs from the spring gallows like a footpad and spews blood” (Th.). – Thienemann 88. – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997). – Margins above and below 4.3-4.7, laterally 5.6-7.5 cm wide– In the far left white margin and especially at the lower corner a little creased. – Shiningly fine impression.

“ In the case of these animals one has set its earth at a place where nature herself has provided the occasion for it that one can accomplish nothing by digging out or bringing in those dachshunds … so the wire snare … is quite a certain means … everything goes off and by the springing of the pole he is captured by the noose by the neck or around the body so that it breaks its neck or back hence is captured without injury of the hide or skin. ”

Offer no. 16,153 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

Ridinger, Foxes are baited, captured, stalked

(How the Foxes are baited, captured and stalked.) On a small elevation in the center four reynards have been tempted by a roe or red deer bait, which three pay for with their lives while the fourth runs off barking. On the right another one has been caught in a steel trap. On the left on a pole a live duck or goose, besides bait hooked up into which a reynard has locked into, yapped at by a further one already struck by a bullet. The hunters themselves behind a wall in the shrubbery at the foot of a rock. Instructively sketched the lines of fire. Inscribed: I. El. Ridinger inv. del. & sculp. / verlegt in Augsburg bey Martin Engelbrecht. – Thienemann 89. – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997). – One of the five plates missing with Helbing, cat. XXXIV, Arbeiten v. J. E. u. M. E. Ridinger, (1900), as individual sheet, too. – Trimmed below within the wide white platemark, otherwise 1-2 mm paper margin around the c. 5 mm wide white platemark. – Warm-toned impression of this markedly rich sheet. – The caption according to Thienemann may be:

“ Also for foxes shooting lodges are set up. Before the same are high poles erected on which the bait is mounted, and the shrieking of a duck mounted on top tempts the appetite of these four-legged fowl lovers. So they partly fall into the steel irons set for them, partly they are killed, too, by the well-aimed crossfire of the guns of the shooters lying in wait in the overgrown ambush. ”

One of the four sheets of the Ways to trap the Animals with the address of Martin Engelbrecht (1684-1756, the publishing house of the same name until 1827) in Augsburg and except for Thienemann & Schwarz and for Th. 74 & 91 also with Hamminger only known in impressions without the explanatory caption.

Offer no. 16,154 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

Ridinger, Alienated Fox with Steel Iron

To capture an old alienated Fox with the Steel Iron. In fine night of a full moon Reynard picks up the scent towards the bait mounted onto a post in the water. In front of this the steel iron in outline. “We shall see if the old rogue will be charmed” (Th.). Besides, on the opposite higher bank the hunter lies ready with the gun. On the left in the background bridge and thatched building. – Thienemann 90; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, III.19 with ill.; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 39. – 5 mm margin around the by itself 6-8 mm wide white platemark. – A tear of 12 cm at the right upper corner professionally done and perceptible within the subject as slight pleat the most. – Very fine painterly sujet.

“ The steel iron is set at places where spring or backwater which yet have a drain where it is very shallow … beside of it some viscera of a roe stuck up elevated on a fork, on the side a low but overgrown fence added which lead the fox towards the iron … so he is … brought onto the steel iron and captured well as otherwise old and alienated foxes  are not easily brought onto overgrown irons anymore. ”

Offer no. 16,155 / EUR  590. / export price EUR  561. (c. US$ 649.) + shipping

Ridinger, Badger in Turnpike

(The Badger captured with the Turnpike.) In fine forest region Master Brock has been killed by the trap while leaving his earth running below a rock. Inscribed: I. El. Ridinger inv. del. & sculp. / verlegt in Augsburg bey Martin Engelbrecht. – Thienemann 91; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 40 with ill. – Not in the 1999 Ridinger catalog Darmstadt. – One of the five plates missing with Helbing, cat. XXXIV, Arbeiten v. J. E. u. M. E. Ridinger, (1900), as individual sheet, too. – Trimmed below within the wide white platemark, above to the platemark, laterally with fine margin around the white platemark of c. 5 mm. – The caption may be:

“ Man often has to ally with cunning to catch the unsuspicious creature he has chosen for his hunting pleasure. To the different ways of catching the badger also belongs an own device which resembles a turnpike that is erected in front of the tunnel of the badger’s earth … ”

One of the four sheets of the Ways to trap the Animals with the address of Martin Engelbrecht (1684-1756, the publishing house of the same name until 1827) in Augsburg and except for Thienemann & Schwarz and for Th. 74 & 91 also with Hamminger only known in impressions without the explanatory caption.

Offer no. 16,156 / EUR  570. / export price EUR  542. (c. US$ 627.) + shipping

Ridinger, Trap before Earth of Badger

Compulsory Trap before the Earth of a Badger. In fine mountainscape Master Brock just leaves his earth – and thus rushes into his destruction. – Thienemann 92; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 41. – Not in the 1999 Ridinger catalog Darmstadt. – The preparatory drawing in reverse from February 1748 then in the Schwerdt Collection (III, 217/3). – 5-6 mm margin around the itself 8-9 mm wide white platemark. – As painterly as instructive.

“ If a badger or fox made his earth at a place where one can get at with this kind of traps, the same is exactly installed before the earth … however, all other tunnels have to be stopped well. Yet the box a. is 1½. foot wide and high, long 2. foot … (as soon as) the animal in the earth … now touches the same … the drop board … will be banged down, as it then gets the badger or fox in the small of the back, it breaks the same that they stick without harm of the skin or hide. ”

Offer no. 16,157 / EUR  530. / export price EUR  504. (c. US$ 583.) + shipping

Ridinger, Otter in Trap & Steel Iron

An Otter in the Trap and the Steel Iron. “Water, reeds, rocks and two captured otters are to be seen here” (Th.). – Thienemann 93. – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997). – 4-7 mm margin around the itself 1 cm wide white platemark. – Small rust or brown spot at the lower edge of the caption, a tiny tear in the white paper margin at the lower left corner backed acid-freely. – Very painterly instructive subject.

“ As these animals belong among the amphibia which live in the water and on the land thereby create great damage at the fish in pools, lakes, creeks and rivers, so they are much hunted as carnivores … the most usual means is that one lies steel irons for them below the water onto poles driven in for this … Another kind of traps is required when they have done their earths between the rocks and chasms bordering on the water where one cannot get at them, so a place is looked for through which they pass, also the water is shallow … and builds represented trap onto … comes now the otter at the same and touches it, so the upper beam falls down and transfixes it with its pikes that one can get the old along with the young ones by and by. ”

Offer no. 16,158 / EUR  590. / export price EUR  561. (c. US$ 649.) + shipping

Ridinger, Capercaillie Hunt with Yapper

How the Capercaillies are shot before the Capercaillie dog or Yapper. In original wood cock flown up in a tree. Below the yapping bird dog, on the left the hunter shooting. – Thienemann 94; Dietrich Stahl, Über die Jagd mit verbellenden Vogelhunden, in Et Multum et Multa, Festgabe für Kurt Lindner, 1971, pp. 385 ff. with ill. 2. – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997).

“ Notwithstanding it is professed that the capercaillies can be shot only in the rutting, so one has carried the matter so far nonetheless that one shoots them outside it, too, by a really small dog called the capercaillie yapper … now if he gets at this noble winged game it flows up in a tree as the dog barks at it, if the hunter hears this he has to come running upwind as much as possible but also be cautious that he does not make the capercaillie get off by too much noise … ”

“ It certainly belongs to the rarities in the field of the hunting technique having one kind of hunting been preserved practically unchanged through centuries down to our present time. This is especially true if it is about such a specific hunt as that with bark alerting bird dogs … Johann Elias Ridinger

has represented this hunt in a particularly fine sheet ”

(Stahl). – In the margin 3.2-4.7 cm wide partially unessentially timemarked. Pinhead-small brown spot in the foliage of the upper edge of the subject. – Painterly sujet.

Offer no. 15,756 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 692.) + shipping

– The same with 1-1.4 cm margin around the itself 5 mm wide white platemark.

Offer no. 16,159 / EUR  590. / export price EUR  561. (c. US$ 649.) + shipping

Ridinger, Partridges captured with Net

How the Partridges are captured with the Net. Two hunters draw the large-sized net over the flock of partridges the pointer stands at while a third one takes off his coat to throw it over the bag that none escapes. On the bar behind a bird of prey. – Thienemann 97; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX (1885), 1787 (only as new impression); Stubbe, Die Jagd in der Kunst – Johann Elias Ridinger, Hamburg/Berlin 1966, pl. 12; Deutsches Leben der Vergangenheit, Eugen Diederichs Vlg., ill. 1489. – Not in the Ridinger catalogs Darmstadt (1999) and Kielce (1997). – One of the five plates missing with Helbing, cat. XXXIV, Arbeiten v. J. E. u. M. E. Ridinger, (1900), as individual sheet, too. – Margins on three sides 2.6-4 cm, on the left 7-11 mm wide.

“ This is such a wellknown thing to the connoisseurs of the hunt that I regard it superfluous to recall more of it than; that one shall know well to handle the net, to pick up and tie the same so that it never gets confused … Above all it depends on a well-trained pointer which stands the fowls correctly … some even lie down before the fowls and stand the net well … if the flying up of the fowls begins … those who have netted take off their coats and throw them hotfoot onto the net and the fowls so that they not contract the net by the flying up and break through, but can be taken alive or dead. ”

Offer no. 16,160 / EUR  590. / export price EUR  561. (c. US$ 649.) + shipping

– The same in as contrast-rich as warm-toned impression with fine margin around the 7 mm wide white platemark and thus still acceptable. On the back traces of previous mounting in spots.

Offer no. 28,082 / EUR  562. / export price EUR  534. (c. US$ 617.) + shipping

Ridinger, Crow Magpie and Raven Lodge

No Protected Songbirds yet

Crow Magpie and Raven Lodge! “There it stands before us as a mound with shooting holes from which is shot presently. Above on a pole the eagle owl sits, attacked and frightened by many birds, below lie and flap killed and wounded birds” (Th.) The mound surrounded by not just bare, but dead trees as vanitas symbols, in the background of the light winter scenery a larger village. On the left in the mound the entrance to the lodge secured with planks and door, in front horse skull and other bait. – Thienemann 98; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt, 1999, III.20 with ill.; Ridinger catalog Kielce, 1997, 42; Deutsches Leben der Vergangenheit, Eugen Diederichs Vlg., ill. 1488. – Small rust spot in the upper left corner. On the left two tiny tears in the white paper margin of 1.5 cm around backed acid-freely. – Exceedingly lively subject.

“ This is set in the field on a mound over which these birds usually take their flight from a village to the field … it is furnished with shooting holes … in the center of the lodge there is left a hole so one can run a pole through it up and down onto this pole … the great eagle owl is tied at top … raised or lowered that he starts to flap his wings, as soon as the crows magpies or ravens see this they frequently gather … as then they can be shot from the lodge with great pleasure and a whole district can although not completely freed from these birds of prey so detrimental to the winged game yet quite reduced. ”

Offer no. 16,161 / EUR  590. / export price EUR  561. (c. US$ 649.) + shipping


“ The prints arrived safely. What is your return policy? My boss, doesn’t like the images, which I understand is subjective (– probably in reaction on the 11th September –) and no reflection on the condition or any representations you made. Sorry to bother you with this ”

(Mrs. A. P., September 26, 2001)