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Animal of the Year 2015 or not —

Ridinger, Hare Hunt (Menzler)
Johann Elias Ridinger, Hare Hunt. Lithograph by Hermann Menzler (detail)

“ It still quite frequently strikes
the Weak Hare ! ”
( Ridinger / Brockes )

Oh! Am I not a Poor Little Hare?
Oh! Am I not a Poor Little Hare? (detail)

Now it’s again all about the
Roast Hare !

Hare Hunt is On

« They set forth, armed to the teeth,

about three thousand, about three hundred, about thirty,

terrible to look at in their war trappings »

Hermann Löns, Mümmelmann

Alphonse de Neuville, Hunt Refreshment

L’Ouverture de la Chasse

While four of the hunting party rather enjoy a comfortable refreshment in the hunting district with pipe and wine, a fifth already presents a hare – which in turn has exhausted three more of the hunters. Toned wood engraving by Jules Huyot (Toulouse 1841 – Eaubonne 1921) after Alphonse de Neuville (St. Omer 1836 – 1885). C. 1870. 8½ × 12⅜ in (21.6 × 31.5 cm).

Boetticher III, 148. – Neuville was pupil of i. a. Delacroix and has made himself “known as draughtsman, too”. Otherwise predominantly history and battle painter. – Some small foxspots and faint tidemark in the wide margin.

Offer no. 11,977 / EUR  189. (c. US$ 206.) + shipping

Johann Elias Ridinger, Small Grey English Hare and Stober Hounds

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Small Grey English Hare and Stober Hounds. Six of them at mountainous edge of the wood, “two pairs coupled, the stoberhund wire-haired”. Etching & engraving. (1738.) Inscribed: J. E. Ridinger inv. fec. et exc. A.V. / N. 15., otherwise in German as above. 7¼ × 6 in (18.5 × 15.2 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 405. – Sheet 15 of the instructive set Design of Several Animals in its first edition with its strong laid paper. Appropriately fine in the chiaroscuro. – “These plates are much wanted and frequently copied” (Th. 1856). – Margins above & below 5.7-7.4 cm, laterally 2-2.3 cm wide. – On the left verso 1 cm narrow fold strip from previous stitching. – At the upper edge still both the two original fine pricks.

Offer no. 15,640 / EUR  185. (c. US$ 202.) + shipping

Johann Elias Ridinger, Hare Hunt

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Hare Hunt. On a clearing pursued by three greyhounds and almost overtaken. Toned lithograph by Hermann Menzler printed by A. Renaud for L. J. Heymann in Berlin. (1863-65.) Inscribed: Gez. v. J. E. Ridinger, lith. v. H. Menzler etc., otherwise in German as above. 10⅜ × 11⅝ in (26.3 × 29.4 cm).

(Joh. El. Ridinger’s Hunting Album) II/1. – Cf. sheet 18 of Fair Game Hounded by the Different Kinds of Hounds, Thienemann 156. – From the (Album of Interesting Hunt and Group Pictures) carried as 2nd part. – The whole rare set almost unknown to literature and comprising 80 sheet plus a recently discovered illustrated title of far larger image size (13¾ × 14⅛ in [47.5 × 36 cm]), though practically to be completed just peu à peu. In the pictorial effect corresponding to that of the aquatint technique not used by Ridinger anymore. – On buff wide-margined paper of impeccable freshness. – Compared with the etching the top rounding here enlarged to oblong square. Ridinger’s spruces beyond the valley right here changed to tall pines. In regard of this certain independence

additionally charming as collection enrichment .

Offer no. 28,447 / EUR  330. / export price EUR  314. (c. US$ 343.) + shipping

Antonio Tempesta, Hare Hunt

Tempesta, Antonio (Florence 1555 – Rome 1630). Hare Coursing with hounds and the masters mounted on horseback in particularly picturesque landscape with mountain castle in the distance. Front left huntsman with javelin and hound. Etching by or for Claes Jansz. Visscher de Jonghe (1586 Amsterdam 1652). (1639.) 4¼ × 5½ in (10.8 × 14 cm).

Schwerdt II, 251 (“proof impressions”). – On fine, wide-margined laid paper with coat-of-arms watermark.

Highly instructive and very painterly sheet

from the second part of the 32-sheet set of the Aucupationis Multifariæ Effegies Artificiosissimé depictæ et inventæ ab Antonio Tempesta Florentino and present here as with Schwerdt in

early impression before the  letter

with just the number “11” on the right in the wide white lower platemark from the collection “EK” not identified by Lugt with its small black round monogram stamp on the back (ligated, Lugt 3549, drawings and prints of the 17th to 19th centuries) as well as erroneous attribution to Christoffel van Sichem “about 1550 – 1600 / Delft – Augsburg” in pencil.

Offer no. 28,569 / EUR  148. (c. US$ 161.) + shipping

« When they were all gone ,

Master Hare scampered to the pocket .

There was blood , here a little , hare blood ,

and there a lot , human blood ,

and the old hare’s little heart swell

of satisfied vengefulness .

When the other day the gamekeeper searched ,

he found a circle around the red spot

tramped down like a threshing floor

where the assessor had shot the government surveyor into the leg .

And he saw that that the hares had done ,

and he shook the head and looked quite bewildered . »

Hermann Löns, Mümmelmann

Johann Elias Ridinger, How the Hares are hunted with Hounds

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). La Chasse des Lievres par les Levriers. How the Hares are hunted with Hounds. In open hilly landscape with trees and shrubbery spanned by a splendid rainbow near a farm two huntsmen gallop “after the hounds which are (already only too gladly) about to seize a little hare. Behind some hunters on foot and searching hounds” (Th.). Etching & engraving. (1729.) Inscribed: Avec privil. de Sa Maj. Imp. / I. El. Ridinger inv. pinx. sculps. et excud. A.V., otherwise as above and with German-French didactic text. 13¼ × 16¼ in (33.5 × 41.3 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 46; Catalog Weigel XXVIII (1857), Ridinger appendix 3A (“Old impressions with the original title. The paper has lines as watermark.”). – From the unnumbered early 36-sheet Princes’ Pleasure , listed by literature as its 34th sheet. – Margins on three sides 2.8-3.6, on the right 5.7 cm wide.

An autonomous detail drawing in reverse in black pen over pencil with brown wash of the two hounds chasing the hare front left and the church district from Th. 44, the Hare Hunt with Nets, traded here in recent time into a Bavarian private collection.

“ How merry this hunt is is best known to those who practice it … they tend to go uphill or run on stony hard paths that the hounds cannot follow them so well … (and) it gives them by many turns back leaps and other craftiness so much to do that they hardly get at it and after many done doubles still keeps its life. ”

THE THRILLINGLY DYNAMIC , PAINTERLY SHEET

– not by chance already in 1901 Ernst Welisch qualified Ridinger as the indisputably “most important Augsburg landscapist of this time” –

IN MARVELOUS IMPRESSION

OF DEEPLY STAGGERED VIBRANT CHIAROSCURO

as in such quality rare of old.

Offer no. 15,484 / EUR  1300. / export price EUR  1235. (c. US$ 1347.) + shipping

Christian Kröner, Hare Hunt

Kröner, Christian (Rinteln 1838 – Dusseldorf 1911). Hare Hunting. One already turns wheels, the other will stay in the fire. Wood engraving by Max Weber (b. Stuttgart 1847) in the Xylographic Institute of O. Roth, Leipsic, after design of 1869. (1873.) 23.4 x 17.7 cm.

Offer no. 11,170 / EUR  76. (c. US$ 83.) + shipping

The Pointers’ Four Duties

Represented surprisingly inadequately in Old Inventories

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Pointers in Action. Set of 4 sheet. Etching with engraving. Inscribed: J. E. Ridinger inv. del. sc. et exc. A. V., otherwise in German as below. 11⅛-11⅜ × 9⅞-10⅛ in (28.2-28.9 × 25-25.8 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 101-104; Catalog Weigel XXVIII (1857), Ridinger 9 A (“Old impressions on laid paper.”); Nagler 23; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX, 1790 (“newer impressions”, 1885); Collection Reich auf Biehla 17 (2 of which as “new impressions”, 1894); Georg Hamminger collection 1540 (only 3 sheet, one of which in addition with text margin only); Helbing XXXIV (1900), 241; Schwerdt III (1928), 136. – Not in Coppenrath collection (1889/90).

Pointer before a Hare in the Lair – Pointer on Pheasants – Great Pointer in Action at Partridges – Small Pointer in Action at Quails .

The extraordinarily charming unnumbered suite

Johann Elias Ridinger, Pointer before Hare
Pointer before a Hare in the Lair

“ worked by Ridinger in his best period ”

(Th.) each in picturesque landscape in conjunction with grain fields, sheet four additionally before a herm splendidly adorned with arabesques and crowned by Augsburg’s cembra nut – “the Pyr, once mark of the Roman legionnaires when they pressed northward, but also ancient symbol of fertility” (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Jan. 17, 1985).

Impressions originating from an old omnibus volume of a nobleman on strong laid paper with at least partially typographic watermarks and wide margins of laterally 3-4, above & below 8-10 cm, the first three of which numbered by old hand in bistre XXXXVI-XXXXVIII. – Sheet 1 partly & sheet 4 (7 mm wide light brown streak at the lower far edge) quite marginally below inked a touch to black, otherwise very very fine.

Sheets 2 & 4 later with plate nos. 67 and 86 (Schwarz 104a) upper right as mark of their use within later editions of the Wondrous Stags and other Animals and replacing there the original pointers Th. 308 and 328 resp.

Increased by those and two further ones (Th. 274 & 278) one encounters the suite also as 6 and 8-sheet set resp. Correspondingly Th. 274: “Is also sold with the collection: ‘Pointers’ if six piece are stated.” And in 8 sheets numbered consecutively in writing it was included here in an earlier contemporary omnibus volume. Th. 274 & 278 currently available here apart.

Offer no. 15,693 / EUR  2300. / export price EUR  2185. (c. US$ 2383.) + shipping

Eagle Owl — Hare — Hunter — Triad

Thematically as well as the Sheet itself — “Extremely Rare”

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). The poor hare falls to the sun-shy owl’s share and this to the hunter’s barrel /: A rare case!:/ … Eagle owl with hare in the claws above hilly landscape with rocks under the full moon, looking down at the firing huntsman. Etching & engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: III. / Joh. El. Ridinger inv. et del. / Mart. El. Ridinger sculps. Aug. Vind., otherwise in German as before and below. 13¾ × 9¼ in (34.9 × 23.6 cm).

Johann Elias Ridinger, The Poor Hare

Thienemann & Schwarz 346; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX, 1868 ( “Very rare”, 1885! ) ; Reich auf Biehla Collection 93 (“Extremely rare”, 1894! ); Helbing XXXIV, Works by J. E. and M. E. Ridinger, 860 (“Rare”, 1900).

The very very fine scenery

as sheet III of the 46-sheet set To the Special Events and Incidents at the Hunt (“The rarest set of Ridinger’s sporting line engravings”, Schwerdt 1928), etched exclusively by Martin Elias after predominantly his father’s designs and concluded in 1779.

The two closing lines of the caption

“ He who suppresses weaker ones should not rejoice too much .

For quite easily a stronger one comes over him ”

besides documenting also here that Ridinger deliberately passed over in silence till now, who was subject of the Dresden Address – The Minimized Ridinger here given on the ceremonial act of the Technical University Dresden on occasion of his 300th birthday.

Wide-margined impression of very fine chiaroscuro originating from the omnibus volume of the old estate of a nobleman with typographic watermark as supposed countermark of the Wangen paper mill as one of Ridinger’s preferred firm laid paper qualities

with the Roman number

(“If they are missing, so this points to later impressions”, Th.). The set itself “arranged almost throughout so that always two by two harmonize with each other and form pendants, just as they have been sold in pairs, too” (Th.). – Acid-freely backed small tear as well as small box pleat at the white upper edge.

Offer no. 15,705 / EUR  870. / export price EUR  827. (c. US$ 902.) + shipping

A White Hide checks Many a Shot

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). White Hare. Coming from undergrowth, scenting to the left. Colored etching/engraving, supposedly by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: LEPVS albus. / Weißer Hase. / Lievre blanc. / Familia III. Vierzähige. / Riding. fec. 12 × 8⅛ in (30.6 × 20.7 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 1044. – IN  THE  RIDINGERS’  ORIGINAL  COLORING  from the unnumbered Colored Animal Kingdom created since 1754 and concluded finally posthumously not before 1773 (“Complete copies are next to untraceable”, so Weigel, Art Cat., part XXVIII, Ridinger Appendix 63a as merely 120-sheet torso, 1857 ! , but also just individual sheets quite rarely on the market only, at niemeyer’s presently nevertheless the one as the others). – Remaining uncolored contrary to the prospectus, a second edition from the plates shortened even under loss of animals and with modified titling and the Ridinger inscription removed, yet now numbered, was published by Engelbrecht/Herzberg in Augsburg 1824/25.

Ridinger, White Hare

“ Of the wild species hares we have delivered here three illustrations, that is a common reddish one, a white one, and one spotted, which furthermore was cornuted; however, both the latter kinds are something rare ”

(Ridinger’s sons in the preamble to pt. II in German and French, pp. 3 & 2 f. resp., enclosed in copy).

Today enjoying protection the full year ,

Thienemann writes in addition:

“ White it is in the winter coat, otherwise it resembles the common one, and represents an own species which lives in the Alps. ”

The fine sujet in its vibrant colorfulness

with watermark C & I Honig, similar to Heawood 3346 & 3348, as that sturdy Dutch quality paper Ridinger used in line with his preamble to the Principal Colors of Horses

“on account of the fine illumination” for the colored works

“as for this purpose it is the most decent and best”.

The attribution of the transfer into copper to presumably Johann Elias’ eldest on the basis of the sole inscription “Riding. fec.” with at the same time rarer omission of the “er”, as with the plate of the rabbits, Th. 1046, too. The Brown Hare as well as the Cornuted Hare (Th. 1043 and 1045 resp.) each with written-out Ridinger. – Margins on three sides 2-3 cm, below 4.9 cm wide.

Offer no. 15,905 / EUR  470. / export price EUR  447. (c. US$ 488.) + shipping

One of the Finest , Most Elegant Sujets

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Windhetzer. Chasseur aux levrieres. (Coursing a Hare.) Riding with great ease & elegance under high sky across the undulatory park-like landscape covered with few groups of trees after a hare. Hunting along two big greyhounds. Etching and engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). C. 1764. Inscribed: L. / Joh. El. Ridinger inv. del. et exc. Aug. Vind. / Mart. El. Ridinger sculps., otherwise as above. 13¼ × 10⅛ in (33.8 × 25.6 cm).

Johann Elias Ridinger, Chasseur aux levrieres (Coursing a Hare

Thienemann & Schwarz 124; Ortega y Gasset, (Meditations on the Hunt), 1981, full-size ills. (frontispiece); Pietsch (Ed.), (Porcelain Parforce), 2005, pp. 50 & 121 with illustrations; Steiner, Reverse Paintings on Glass, 2004, 40/40a with illustrations; Wüst, (An Early Modern Country in Hunting-Fever – The “ius venandi” of the Margraves of Brandenburg-Ansbach, in Triesdorfer Hefte 9, (The Hunt of the Margraves of Brandenburg-Ansbach in the Early Modernity), 2010, pp. 12 & 25 (illustration, this copy).

Sheet 12 (“L.”) of the 25-sheet suite of the Hunters and Falconers with their Work. – “The personal hierarchy began with simple rifle cockers, court huntsmen, ‘still hunt-hands, wind hunters’ … ” (Wüst), the latters “those hunting with greyhounds” (Riesenthal).

With FIAT watermark, related to the WANGEN paper favored by Ridinger. – Margins laterally 4, top & bottom 5.3-5.6 cm wide. – Lower edge and upper left on the back with old trace of glue.

The preparatory drawing in the same direction from a Westphalian Ridinger collection distinguished by unique drawings & states traded here in the 1970s. – Reverse etching on glass of the same size about 1800 in reverse in gold & silver-leaf backed by a layer of black pigment by Jonas Zeuner (Cassel 1727 – Amsterdam 1814), see above. And Michael Victor Acier (Versailles 1736 – Dresden 1795) probably used the scenery about 1766 for a Meissen plate, replacing the hare by a stag and leaving out the back one of the two hounds.

Besides the work corroborates, quite en passant, Ernst Welisch (1901) that Ridinger has been indisputably the “most important Augsburg landscapist  at this time”. And this “although he is primarily known as animal painter”.

Offer no. 15,435 / EUR  870. / export price EUR  827. (c. US$ 902.) + shipping

Menaces to a Hare's Life

“ The Hare has a Great Many Enemies ,
but the Worst is Man ”

(Hare, Oh! Am I not a Poor Little?) All menaces to a hare’s life, from snares, weasel, fox, wolf, cat, and birds of prey – of the latter even several with feeding at the aerie – up to the larded roast with red wine after the battue in the center field. Wood engraving by Jules Huyot (Toulouse 1841 – Eaubonne 1921) after Ph. Müller. (1873.) Inscribed: Ph. Müller / Huyot, otherwise typographically in German as above and 3-column distich after an old song. 8⅞ × 12¼ in (22.5 × 31.2 cm). – Barely perceptible faint foxing top left within the subject and at the center of the caption.

“ The hare has a great many enemies, but the worst is man … and if the doe would breed only once a year and not three or even four times, no hare would live on earth anymore, for his enemies are too many,

since his game is too delicate ”

(Hermann Löns, [The Brown Hare]).

Offer no. 12,498 / EUR  97. (c. US$ 106.) + shipping

« The louder a person acts , the less suspicious he is ,

but the more furtive he is ,

the more the hare has to be on his guard against him .

Fortunately the hare has many friends , too ,

who warn against man .

When the wren clamors or the throstle scrapes

one has to keep the ears stiff …

The roes are very reliable ;

as long as they browse trustingly the hare may as well ;

yet when they raise the heads , then it is commanded

to build a cone and look around ,

and when they fly to the woods , one does well follow them »

Hermann Löns, Der Feldhase

Ridinger’s Picture Unit of a Threefold Food Chain

Hare — Eagle — Wildcat — Hunter

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). The poor hare in his ultimate plight brings … Hare stricken by the eagle whom the male wildcat bites through the throttle, itself shot by the huntsman. Inclusive of any pre-prey. Etching & engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: V. / Joh. El. Ridinger inv. et del. / Mart. El. Ridinger Sculps. Aug. Vind., otherwise in German as before. 13⅞ × 10⅛ in (35.3 × 25.8 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 348; Reich auf Biehla Collection 95 ( “Rare”, 1894! ). – Missing in the 1885 Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX and in Helbing’s 43-sheet stock of the set (cat. XXXIV, Works by J. E. and M. E. Ridinger, 1900, 1554 nos.) it was represented in just one and only relatively fine copy (no. 862). – With 6 lines caption.

Johann Elias Ridinger, Hare, Eagle, Cat, Hunter

Arched top sheet V of the 46-sheet set To the Special Events and Incidents at the Hunt ( “The rarest set of Ridinger’s sporting line engravings”, Schwerdt 1928) etched exclusively by Martin Elias after predominantly his father’s designs and concluded in 1779.

Warm-toned wide-margined impression originating from the omnibus volume of the old estate of a nobleman with watermark WANGEN as one of Ridinger’s preferred firm laid paper qualities

with the Roman number

(“If they are missing, so this points to later impressions”, Th.). – At the edge of the upper margin still both the two pinholes from the original stitching in numbers.

The set itself “arranged almost throughout so that always two by two harmonize with each other and form pendants, just as they have been sold in pairs, too” (Th.). Here thus with the rare scene of the couple of stags struck by lightning. “Both the two pieces belonging together – so Thienemann – are well done.”

Offer no. 15,706 / EUR  790. / export price EUR  751. (c. US$ 819.) + shipping

– – – The same, yet with only 0.9 (right) to 3.1 cm visibly less wide-margined. Below besides quite a little age-spotted. Likewise faint tidemark in the upper white plate and paper-margin.

Offer no. 14,122 / EUR  706. / export price EUR  671. (c. US$ 732.) + shipping

Johann Elias Ridinger, Lying in wait for Hares and how they are driven by the Stoberhund

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Comme on chasse les Lievres par les Levretes. Lying in wait for Hares and how they are driven by the Stoberhund. In rich hilly tree landscape “two Stoberhunds in most fugitive run” drive three hares before the rifles of two huntsmen, with

the fire of the one in front and the ignition lock of the one still aiming

very nicely visible .

One of the longears then already has done his last breath. Etching & engraving. (1729.) Inscribed: Avec privil de Sa Maj. Imp. / I. El. Ridinger invent. pinx. sculps. et excud. Aug.Vind., otherwise as above and with German-French didactic text. 13⅛ × 16⅛ in (33.2 × 41 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 45; Catalog Weigel XXVIII (1857), Ridinger appendix 3A (“Old impressions with the original title. The paper has lines as watermark.”). – From the unnumbered early 36-sheet Princes’ Pleasure , listed by literature as its 33rd sheet.

Johann Elias Ridinger, Lying in wait for Hares and how they are driven by the Stoberhund (detail)

The preparatory drawing in reverse in pencil and black chalk traced and ruddled on the back used for the transfer into the copper presently available here still without the third hare at which aforesaid hunter just aims nevertheless. On the other hand in the engraving the replacement rifle leaning by the two already killed hares in the back of the huntsmen is missing.

“ Among so many persecutions which the hare has to endure, also this is one of the heaviest … the right manner to hunt them this way is, if one … has trained before his Stoberhund quite well … Such dogs have to be set on young hares only at first … ”

Margins 2.7-4.4 cm wide. – Barely noticeable on the subject side vertical trace of box pleat and small paper injury at the old stitching margin as well as unobtrusive tiny abrasion in the central foliage and two small tears backed acid-freely in the wide white margin.

THE PAINTERLY SHEET

– not by chance already in 1901 Ernst Welisch qualified Ridinger as the indisputably “most important Augsburg landscapist of this time” –

IN MARVELOUS IMPRESSION

OF DEEPLY STAGGERED VIBRANT CHIAROSCURO

as in such quality rare of old.

Offer no. 15,485 / EUR  1250. / export price EUR  1188. (c. US$ 1296.) + shipping

Still without the 3rd Hare
at which , however , one of the Hunters just aims

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Lying in wait for Hares and How They are driven by the Stoberhund. In rich hilly wooded landscape “Two Stoberhunds in the most fleetingly run” drive two – in the engraving three ! – hares before the guns of two hunters. Pencil & black chalk. C. 1729. 10¾ × 16 in (273 × 408 mm).

Provenance

Dr. Edward Peart

(1756/58 – 1824)

his written E P. front below left

Johann Elias Ridinger, Lying in wait for Hares and How They are driven by the Stoberhund (drawing)

( “ wrote the initials of his name onto each sheet ” )

Lugt 891; Nagler, Monogramists, II, 1723

Exhibition

(Fine Hunting Bag — Pictures of Hunting)

Dr. Hanns Simon Foundation Bitburg

January 13 – March 3, 2013

Literature

Catalog Book to the Exhibition

pages 44/45 (double full-page detail illustration),

erroneously as The Spring of the Hounds as exhibited, too, & page 148/I

The preparatory drawing in reverse used for the transfer into the plate – recto traced, verso ruddled – of Thienemann 45 as sheet 33 – cf. comparative illustration –

Johann Elias Ridinger, Lying in wait for Hares and How They are driven by the Stoberhund (etching)
Johann Elias Ridinger, Lying in wait for Hares.
Etching & engraving. (1729.)

of the Accomplished and Thorough Representations of the Excellent Princes’ Pleasure or the Noble Hunting … invented brought into Copper … Anno 1729. as Ridinger’s first hunting set now etched/engraved and published by himself and in accordance with the master’s continual didactic intent at the same time a practical instruction

“ … as such to the true character as also right application of all requisites belonging hereto necessary to each animal’s kind and manner, in particular, however, of those sportsmanlike terms usual hereto have been represented quite distinctly

and drawn from life ”.

Of the two hunters here on the left the back one still aiming while the front one just fires at the first hare in full flight with

the fire of the one in front and the ignition lock of the one still aiming

very nicely visible .

The second hare is already shot down. On execution of the plate Ridinger seems to have noticed that the direction of the just aiming shooter’s barrel rather misses, otherwise is meant for the same target the neighbor already fires at. So he slightly changed the direction of the barrel, set the first of the two dogs somewhat back

and established in the free space a third hare .

On the other hand in the engraving the reserve gun leaning at the two already bagged hares is missing.

Fine large-sized early

pictorially worked painterly drawing

which found its own ways already early and therefore in 1830 did not pass with the 32-sheet (among which 2 duplicate versions) block of preparatory drawings to the Princes’ Pleasure into the immense Weigel inventory of the master’s bequest of drawings and therefore remained unknown to Thienemann (1856, page 274, a, “partly in brown ink and wash, partly in pencil and chalk”, the latter as also present here) just as to the Ridinger appendix of the 1869 catalog of the Collection of Original Drawings now bequeathed by J. A. G. Weigel.

Johann Elias Ridinger, Lying in wait for Hares and How They are driven by the Stoberhund (ruddled back)
The ruddled back

Extraordinarily charming

the master’s working process to be duplicated here ,

the desired look over his shoulder at the transfer into the plate. Beside the red chalk on the back the here especially manifold tracing of the important parts on the subject side the filling of which was done freely in the plate, yet is utterly executed here.

On finely structured heavy laid paper. – The edge of the sheet somewhat age-marked with slight impairment of the “E” of the Peart initial. Here and there unobtrusively somewhat fox spotted, in the outer part of the subject below left a narrow 3 cm dirt stripe, otherwise of fine general impression.

From the collection of the physician practicing and publishing in London & Butterwick, Dr. Edward Peart (1756 or 1758 – Butterwick at Gainsborough 1824), “art connoisseur in London, started a collection of drawings and prints, and

wrote the initials of his name onto each sheet .”

By his hand supposedly also the inscription “Ridinger 1750” on the back below right, the latter put far too late. “This collection was scattered (per 1822)” (Nagler, 1860, continuing). From this then now here & now the master’s early hare hunting as

a Ridinger trouvaille of prime degree

set into an acid-free passepartout with 23.5-karat gilt stamped artist’s name and dates.

Drawings by his hand in such quality in regard of theme , execution and – size (!) require the favor of the moment already since long. niemeyer’s is proud to be able to present twenty years after the above Princes’ Pleasures drawing to Th. 24 used for the transfer into the plate now the one to Th. 45. Thereby both the one then as the present one unknown to literature and thus

elitist lone wolfs since practically already the master’s time !

Offer no. 15,438 / price on application

John Augustus Atkinson, Laplanders Hunting

Atkinson, John Augustus (London 1775 – after 1818/33 or even 1861). Laplanders Hunting. Sitting in a flat-bottomed sledge drawn by two reindeer with already a hare as prey. Aquatint by Matthew Dubourg (fl. London 1808-38) in the original coloring. Inscribed: Atkinson del. / Published & Sold Feby. 1st. 1813, by Edwd. Orme, Bond St. London. / M. Dubourg sculpt., otherwise as above. 7¼ × 9⅛ in (18.3 × 23.3 cm).

Tooley 225, 42; Thieme-Becker II, 212; Nagler I, 179 f. ( “excellent English painter and draughtsman living in Russia for a long time who worked wonderful pictures” ). – From the 1819 2nd edition of FOREIGN FIELD SPORTS , Schwerdt I (1928), 177 ff.: “The coloured plates … are fine, both as regards draughtsmanship and colouring … (The book) is sure to increase in value … ”.

Offer no. 11,767 / EUR  107. (c. US$ 117.) + shipping

Protects the Hare
against the Greedy Pack

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). The Spring of the Hounds. The pack leader defending the hare against three other greyhounds and a waterhound by a boulder. Washed brush drawing over pencil. Inscribed with pale pencil within the subject below left: Joh. Elias Ridinger inv. et del. 17¼-17⅜ × 13¼ in (438-440 × 336 mm) (subject size 16¾-16⅞ × 13¼ in [426-429 × 336 mm]).

Johann Elias Ridinger, The Spring of the Hounds (detail)
Detail: The Protector

Exhibition

(Fine Hunting Bag — Pictures of Hunting)

Dr. Hanns Simon Foundation Bitburg

January 13 – March 3, 2013

Literature

Catalog Book to the Exhibition

Page 148/II

The painterly preparatory drawing in reverse

ruddled on the back and with marks of tracing

to sheet 1, Th. 105 – illustrated also in Blüchel, Die Jagd, II, p. 79 – of the Four Seasons of the Hounds (“Especially excellent are the sheets with the hounds … “, Nagler) supposed for the early ’40s.

On strong, but not heavy laid paper with watermark “IV” (Jean Villedary?, paper mill prospering for 150 years in Angoulême (acc. to Churchill, 1935, p. 21 from 1668 to 1758) and then in resumption or as a branch at Hattem/Netherlands, “sometimes in conjunction with the names of Dutch paper-makers” (Emma Ruffle) where his IV/I V for instance appears as countermark to the ones of C & I HONIG (about 1724/26-1902), but generally also abused as pirated mark like others standing for first qualities, too. We find the “IV” as a contemporary mark in the graphic Ridinger œuvre in many cases, among the drawings e. g. on his 1723 signed one Alexander the Great 326 at the Hyphasis in India present here and as monogram “I V” on the 1762 drawing Wild Ducks stalked by Wildcats in Augsburg (Biedermann, [Master Drawings of German Baroque], 1987, no. 165; the of old rare etched pendants available here). And Villedary’s complete mark “IV ILLEDARY” on the 1736 Good Sport drawing by the younger Georg Philipp Rugendas.

Of best condition except for a pinhead-small hole and, predominantly on the back, seven marginal traces of former mounting in spots on a sheet removed only by now (on this by old hand in italics as inscription in the center “Coursing” and on the right “Ridinger”). In the center of the narrow white subfield of the drawing itself a “20.” in pencil as supposed inventory number of a former owner and therefore mark of origin of a more comprehensive collection of drawings.

The Royal Drawing

for the opening sheet of this wanted rich set, in the engraving explained by the quatrain

Johann Elias Ridinger, The Spring of the Hounds

“ The Hares are catched many, At SPRING TIME /
Before when they offend in the seed field /
But when with highest rage, the hounds set on it /
So the protector has concern, that they do not tear it up . ”

The latter in the present reverse drawing therefore to the left, “the forelegs stretched out over the hare and grawlingly repulsing two other hounds, of which the one, a greyhound as well, lies with the front part in peculiar lurking position on the ground, the other, a waterhound, barking at him. Above these on a boulder there are two other greyhounds who also have a little lust for the hare”.

Contrary to the etching the pack leader’s tip of the tail a little less formed and the waterhound’s left foreleg concealed under the belly.

The pictorially completely executed ,

splendidly large-sized , splendidly high-graded drawing

in its large flat ,

light brown , lucid washing

an exceedingly precious rarity .

Extraordinarily charming finally the duplication of the master’s working process on the transfer to the copper plate in the form of the already mentioned red chalking and tracing, the latter down to sub-parts as not used generally. By this, however, allowing the that wanted, as famous as precious “look over the shoulder”.

Offer no. 28,878 / price on application

The Leeheim Hare
or about the
Sensuality of a Superb Set of Teeth

Johann Elias Ridinger (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). This Hare with Indicated Rare Teeth has been shot in the Forest of Leeheim 4 Hours from Darmstadt Oct. 25, 1753. Printing-plate in reverse. (1754/56.) Inscribed: Joh. El. Ridinger del. fec. et excud. A. V., otherwise in German as before. 13⅜ × 10⅛ in (34.1 × 25.6 cm).

The optically excellently preserved

Ridinger, Hare with rare Teeth

original printing-plate

to sheet 64 (etching & engraving, Thienemann & Schwarz 306; Ridinger Catalog Darmstadt, 1999, VI.6 with ills.; Siebert-Weitz, Ridinger – Bilder zur Jagd in Hessen-Darmstadt, 1999, pp. 34 f. with ills.) of the Representation of the Wondrous Stags and other Animals.

“ The comparably small though marked hare with carefully treated coat sits in front of a light rock to which again the knobby, half withered group of trees … contrasts … (It) has been shot in the Leeheim forest (west of Darmstadt, district Groß-Gerau, today belonging to Riedstadt). Its incisors were grown out of the mouth both above and below. The incisors of the hares do not stop growing when they reached the necessary size. As they are subject to great stress they have permanent growth. If for any reason they are no longer stressed they nevertheless grow forth without this resulting in the soon death of the hare. Thus the

very rare abnormity

as on the sheet worked by Ridinger emerges ”

(Siebert-Weitz).

The latter refer to a preserved carved head of a hare with the teeth and that the work forms a pair with the Stag with the Lob-Ears shot by landgrave Louis VIII in the environs of Darmstadt August 20, 1754, (sheet 63; Th. 305; Cat. Darmstadt VI.5 & Siebert-Weitz pp. 32 f. – “Belongs together with no. 64” – , both with ills.).

Negative report, however, for further memorabilia in Catalog Darmstadt:

“ Just as of the ‘snub-eared’ main boar (sheet 58; Th. 300; Cat. D. VI.4 & S.-W. 30 f., each with ills.) there are no further evidences of this rare animal in the inventory of the hunting seat Kranichstein. ”

Sheltered from tarnishing by fine application of varnish

the plate is printable generally in the ordinary course of its use during the times. But it is offered and sold as a work of art and an object of collecting. Thus without prejudice to its final printing quality. – Shortly ,

a conceivably enjoying , worldwide unique absolutum .

Proposed to you with the recommendation of a timeless-elegantly frameless hanging (fittings included) for that you will experience the reflection of the respective light to the fullest.

Offer no. 15,001 / price on application

Solo Catcher

Solo Catcher, The. Right in front portraitlike large hound with the captured hare while left-sided placed back the field of the horsemen accompanies the hare hunting still going on. Steel engraving. C. 1835. Inscribed as no. XVI, otherwise as above in German along with the address of the Art Establishment of the Bibliographical Institute. 17.4 x 20 cm.

With the full platemark not measuring with, as rather more seldom for steel engravings, and left-sided stitch-margin. – Also see Ridinger’s Light Cours Hunde.

Offer no. 14,819 / EUR  74. (c. US$ 81.) + shipping

Didactic Pieces of Hunting

Thoman(n) von Hagelstein, Ernst Philipp (1657 Augsburg 1726). Didactic Pieces of Hunting. Set of 4 sheet. Mezzotints printed in brown. Sheet 1 inscribed: E. P. Thoman. excudit. 35.2 x 49.7 cm and (sheets 1-3) subject size 34.3-35 x 49-49.4 cm resp.

Schwerdt III, 171, a (Baillie-Grohman’s copy; “A complete and interesting set”). – For fitting into an album three sides trimmed to platemark (only sheet 4 with fine margin) and below at loss of the German quatrains & numbering (Schwerdt: N.1–N.4), mounted by old on laid paper and lined in brown ink. In the white upper margin old inventory inscription (Nro 1, 7, 8, 6/Tom: X/Fol 88, 94, 95, 93), also in brown ink. – Smoothed centerfold.

Pictorially & instructively marvelous set

Ernst Philipp Thoman von Hagelstein, Hare Hunt

Wolf Hunt — Fox Hunt — Hare Hunt — Badger & Hedgehog Hunt

of complete extraordinary rarity

(provable here only the Schwerdt-Baillie-Grohman copy now preserved at the British Museum) in the fine impressions of a comprehensive old stock, richly nuanced in its chiaroscuro and, as all mezzotints by Ernst Philipp, even in single sheets, as here in 52 years also not been present, exceedingly rare. So then, too, as only sheet among the about 27,600 of the first 28 sections of Weigel’s Art Stock Catalog (1838/57; 6,211) just the portrait Rauner as the only one known to Nagler, too, besides a Marten, robbing a Pigeon’s Nest (19,715) figuring as by the son Tobias Heinrich. Which should be a modified repetition of his father’s Marten at the Nest of a Couple of Wild Ducks in the Reeds, on the other hand with regard to the caption certainly missing here along with supposed signature also a casual title by Weigel cannot be precluded.

Beyond the individual-specific rarity above of together general scarceness as result of the mezzotint technique itself. Already in 1675 the expert von Sandrart figured “clean copies” of the velvety mezzotint manner at just about “50-60 (!) … soon after, however, (the picture) grinds off for it not goes deeply into the copper”. Correspondingly in 1856 Thienemann referring to Ridinger :

“ The mezzotints are almost not to be acquired

on the market anymore … and the by far largest part (of them) …

(I have) only found (in the printroom) at Dresden. ”

On the artist dynasty of the Thomans originating from Lindau and flourishing more than 200 years see Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie XXXVIII, 65 f. Whose leading present Ernst Philipp :

“ Did his studies in Italy and acquired fame as

one of the best artists of his time

… In the later period of his life he occupied himself with the mezzotint manner and had in this but One predecessor in Augsburg ”

(Nagler, who mentions animal and hunting pieces, according to ADB in just this manner, only from hints by the younger Paul von Stetten, 1731-1808, but himself found “none of these specified in detail”).

Especially only the Schwerdt Catalog (III [1928], 170 ff.) shed more light into his and his next interesting son’s Heinrich Tobias graphic œuvre, to be complemented by occasional appearance of further works as here, for instance, not least by The Earth / La Terra as, any special literature aside, a first indication to a 4-sheet set of the Elements.

Yet in such a way they are trouvailles still surpassing said technically conditioned preciousness. And here indeed

as a complete didactic set of hunting

a wall decoration par excellence .

See the complete description.

Offer no. 28,996 / price on application

Ridinger, Great Kind of Greyhounds

The Hunt is at Rest — Master Hare anyway

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Great Kind of the Greyhounds of which the larger one represents the guard or rescuer. In fine landscape with vista of a place the two coupled hounds on the right,

guarding the hare bagged by them .

This on the left, lying on its back with the hind quarters on the gun, of which the trigger guard, yet in particular the instructively drawn ramrod are quite nicely visible. Etching with engraving. (1756.) Inscribed: 68. / J. E. Ridinger inven. Sculps. et excudit Aug. Vind., otherwise in German as above. 9⅞ × 7 in (25 × 17.9 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 310. – Plate 68 of the till today unmatched comprehensive standard work Exact and True Representation of Both the Most Wondrous Deer and Other Particular Animals … of the Rarities showing in Nature published for subscription. – With 21¼ × 14¼ in (54 × 36.2 cm) sheet size extremely wide-margined impression on laid paper with typographical watermark untrimmed on three sides. – Printing of the number and the two lines caption a little weak.

Offer no. 16,107 / EUR  470. / export price EUR  447. (c. US$ 488.) + shipping

Antonio Tempesta, Hare Hunt

Tempesta, Antonio (Florence 1555 – Rome 1630). Hare Hunt with crossbows in woody hilly landscape. While in the center the hunt is already up, in the foreground three hunters, one of them mounted, are still stalking close. Etching by or for Claes Jansz. Visscher de Jonghe (1586 Amsterdam 1652). (1639.) 4¼ × 5½ in (10.7 × 14 cm).

Schwerdt II, 251 (“proof impressions”). – On fine, wide-margined laid paper with figurative watermark as presumably countermark to the coat-of-arms watermark of several further sheets of the set present here.

Highly instructive and also painterly sheet

from the second part of the 32-sheet set of the Aucupationis Multifariæ Effegies Artificiosissimé depictæ et inventæ ab Antonio Tempesta Florentino and present here as with Schwerdt in

early  impression before the letter

with just the number “5” on the right in the wide white lower platemark from the collection “EK” not identified by Lugt with its small black round monogram stamp on the back (ligated, Lugt 3549, drawings and prints of the 17th to 19th centuries) as well as erroneous attribution to Christoffel van Sichem “about 1550 – 1600 / Delft – Augsburg” in pencil.

Offer no. 28,567 / EUR  128. (c. US$ 140.) + shipping

Was Ridinger shy
at Confrontation with the Own Work ?

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). The Innocence suppressed by an Invent Pretext. A hare escaped from three dogs on a rock falling a victim to a wonderfully feathered falcon swooping down. Etching and engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). After 1767. Inscribed in the plate: J. El. Ridinger. inv: et del. / M. El. Ridinger. sc. et exc: A. V., otherwise as above in German, Latin, and French. 13¼ × 9¾ in (33.5 × 24.9 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 784; Metzner-Raabe, Illustr. Fabelbuch, 1998, vol. II (Bodemann), 123.I. – Sheet 20 of the Fables. – Quite wonderful impression probably watermarked WANGEN along with a figurative label. – With 5-27 mm wide margins all-around. – The repeated “.” after Ridinger not quoted by Schwarz. Instead of the “:” after “inv” here there only a full stop and instead of the “:” after FABUL mentioned by Thienemann & Schwarz for plates X ff. here always only a full stop.

The exceptionally rare last supplementary sheet

as the final one of the intellectually as optically exceedingly charming Instructive Fables from the Animal Kingdom for Improvement of the Manners and especially for Instruction of the Youth by which

“ Ridinger pursued a typical purpose of his epoch. A ‘Correction of Manners’ by the morale efficacy of art – though in quite a different manner – William Hogarth, almost of the same age as Ridinger, had attempted by his paintings and prints … Yet while Hogarth and Chodowiecki tried to gain recognition for their (identical) ideas by satirical sets, as A Rake’s Progress, 1735 … Ridinger built on the – especially suitable to him (that is, so he himself, ‘since the hoary times of the ancient ages’) – tradition of the animal fable ”

(Stefan Morét, Ridinger Catalog Darmstadt, 1999, p. 96).

At which in this case Ridinger takes in sight still quite another object, that is a social-political one. As already the title

“The Innocence suppressed by an Invent Pretext”

given the tenor, so it says in the separately printed text by Brockes (1680 Hamburg 1747)

“ Enough one charges poor with , / What never he had done . /

The fresh rage of the mighty birds /

hits very often still the weak hare ! ”

And Thienemann interpreting: “The falcon speaks to the hare and this replies:

‘ Wait, I will teach you to lead the hounds to my nest, for that they will rob me of my young ones!’ / ‘How could we approach ourselves to your aerie without wings?’ / ‘Yea, yea, always you think on my ruin, do you not have wanted to sell me to the hunter two years ago and badly cursed my young ones?’ / ‘There I does not still was born.’ / ‘So it was your mother. O no longer I can tolerate this bad species.’

Johann Elias Ridinger, The Innocence suppressed by an Invent Pretext

After this (the falcon) gripped and lacerated the little hare, which dying still cried: ‘Oh, how it is easy for the malice to suppress the innocence!’ … ‘Enough one charges the poor with …’ ”.

The sentence staying in closest context to the denouncing of the system of absolutism of all times expressed by Brockes/Ridinger by sheets Thienemann 716-719 of the set Fights of Killing Animals. See hereto the 1998 Dresden Address – The Minimized Ridinger.

Artistically beyond all that at the same time also, creating a new image type, leaving behind once more tradition and field. For, so Ulrike Bodemann in Metzner-Raabe,

“ No similarities to fable illustrations known hitherto .

Enormous image sizes filled almost entirely by the representation of a central factor of the fable tale. Surroundings mostly dense, natural wood .”

And Regine Timm, ibid., vol. I, p. 171 :

“ In his large plates Ridinger … sometimes has included vegetable growth or rocks, too, dominantly in his illustrations indeed, but without decorative intention. The plants and rocks mean the thicket, the deserted loneliness of the forest, in which the strange tales among the animals happen. ”

The set consists of 20 plates, of which Johann Elias, however, has published only the first sixteen. Presumably by stylistic scruple. For with the four last, etched/engraved only by his eldest, Martin Elias, and published posthumously, he gives up the superabundance of the previous, his moreover only newly worked fable conception, in favour of a now also for himself thoroughly newly, sovereignly formulated large flat clearness (exemplarily for this especially 17th & 20th) with which to grapple with he obviously has shied at the end though. And where to follow him was impossible for Thienemann, too, still one hundred years later (“have less artistic value, but are nevertheless estimable, and their rarity is to regret”). What here, however, is regarded as a remarkably advanced artistic expressiveness. Culminating just in the fascination to have created not only a new fable image, but cultivated this, once more in itself, to a new level.

Comparable in this connection, as quoted repeatedly by Ridinger, it may be pointed out to Watteau and here to his “Party in the Open/Park” in Berlin, on which Pierre Rosenberg notes: “… the Berlin painting is

an evidence for it that the artist wished to reinvent himself

by creation of a new type of composition …”

(Exhibition Catalog Watteau, Washington/Paris/Berlin 1984/85, p. 415).

The practically inevitable great rarity of the four supplementary sheets known to literature since Thienemann’s statement of 1856: they “make themselves very scarce, are already not to be found in some older editions, and have been left out entirely in the latest, what is to be regretted though” (p. 151).

Accordingly then also the 1889 catalog of the Coppenrath Collection on the 20-sheet copy: “Fine main set … Rare”. And in 1900 Helbing qualified in his 1554-item Ridinger catalog (XXXIV): “The last (4) numbers are extremely rare”. And while he owned beside a complete copy multiple single prints of the first sixteen except for 12 & 13, so of the final four plates only 17 & 19 in one additional copy each. On the market till today then almost only the 16-sheet basic set, too.

The different printing states of the title, documenting the repeated editions, besides most beautiful proof of the success of the work, which obviously did reach its particular target group, the youth.

Offer no. 12,514 / EUR  1007. / export price EUR  957. (c. US$ 1044.) + shipping

Johann Elias Ridinger, How the Hares are catched with Nets

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). La Chasse de Lievres. How the Hares are catched with Nets. In hilly tree landscape with church district set back at the center wild-lively scenery of hounding & slaying hounds, in their kind hounding & slaying men, and the minority of the hares anxious for their ears of which one on the far left succeeds in taking it to its heels. Etching & engraving. (1729.) Inscribed: avec privil. de Sa Maj. Imp. / I. El. Ridinger invent. pinx. sculps. et excud. Aug.Vind., otherwise as above and with German-French didactic text. 13¼ × 16¼ in (33.5 × 41.2 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 44; Catalog Weigel XXVIII (1857), Ridinger appendix 3A (“Old impressions with the original title. The paper has lines as watermark.”). – From the unnumbered early 36-sheet Princes’ Pleasure , listed by literature as its 32nd sheet.

For a drawn variant in ink representing the taking out of the hares see Weigel’s catalog of 1869, Ridinger appendix 486. The church district in turn figures in reverse in a detail drawing to Th. 46, the Hare Hunt with Hounds, passed here more recently into Bavarian private collection.

Johann Elias Ridinger, How the Hares are catched with Nets (detail)

“ … this kind to catch them with nets is the most pernicious for them, as it takes many of them at the same time … They are driven with Stober and other hunting dogs under the lead of many people through a whole district to the nets … to speak sportsmanlike one says. The hare is quick, it cries, runs, goes into, bucks, breeds, makes room, grazes, is hunted, torn apart and cast off. ”

Watermark Great Fleur-de-lis (Strasbourg?) visible in outline only. – Margins 3-4.2 cm wide. – Margin tear extending to the last line of text backed acid-freely.

THE AS INSTRUCTIVE AS PAINTERLY SHEET

– not by chance already in 1901 Ernst Welisch qualified Ridinger as the indisputably “most important Augsburg landscapist of this time” –

IN SPLENDID IMPRESSION OF VIBRANT CHIAROSCURO

as in such quality rare of old.

Offer no. 15,483 / EUR  1100. / export price EUR  1045. (c. US$ 1140.) + shipping

Antonio Tempesta, Hare Hunt

Tempesta, Antonio (Florence 1555 – Rome 1630). Hare Coursing with Hounds, on Horseback and on Foot in particularly picturesque hilly landscape with set back buildings. Right in front in the center from laterally behind the large equestrian figure of the owner of the hunt waiting with leashed greyhound, on the left below a tree further huntsman with javelin drinking from a gourd. Etching by or for Claes Jansz. Visscher de Jonghe (1586 Amsterdam 1652). (1639.) 4¼ × 5⅝ in (10.8 × 14.2 cm).

Schwerdt II, 251 (“proof impressions”). – On fine laid paper with typographic watermark as presumably countermark to the coat-of-arms watermark of several further sheets of the set present here.

Highly instructive and also painterly sheet

from the second part of the 32-sheet set of the Aucupationis Multifariæ Effegies Artificiosissimé depictæ et inventæ ab Antonio Tempesta Florentino and present here as with Schwerdt in

early impression before the letter

with just the number “2” on the right in the wide white lower platemark from the collection “EK” not identified by Lugt with its small black round monogram stamp on the back (ligated, Lugt 3549, drawings and prints of the 17th to 19th centuries) as well as erroneous attribution to (Christoffel) v. Sichem – elsewhere complemented by “about 1550 – 1600 / Delft – Augsburg” – in pencil. – Acid-freely backed little dog’s ear in the right white lower margin.

Offer no. 28,568 / EUR  145. (c. US$ 158.) + shipping

Rarely in the Picture —
the Hunters’ Practical Know-how

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). The Gutting of Hare & Stag. Set of 2 sheet. Etching with engraving. Inscribed: J(oh). E(l). Ridinger inv. del. sc. et exc. A(ug). V(ind)., otherwise in German as below. 14¼ × 11 in (36.2-36.3 × 28.1 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz (plt. I, VI f.) 99-100; Weigel XXVIII, Ridinger, 8 A; Nagler 41; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX, 1788/89 ( “Very rare”, 1885!); Coppenrath Collection II, 1457 ( “Very rare ”, 1889!); Reich auf Biehla Collection 16 (“rare”, 1894!); Gg. Hamminger Collection 1539 (“Rare”, 1895!); Schwerdt III, 135; Ortega y Gasset, (Meditations on the Hunt), 1981, ills. pp. 87 & 73; Ridinger Catalog Darmstadt, 1999, V.1 & 2 with illustrations.

Missing in Helbing’s 1554-sheet offer of 1900

just as in 1940 in that of Rosenthal (444 nos.). For the preparatory drawing on the curée of the stag of 1758, now Bavarian private collection, see Schwerdt III, 215 with plate 251, qualified as

“ … quite apart from its artistic value ,

an interesting document from a historical point of view ”

with the distinguishing result of illustration of both each in both Schwarz and Ortega, too.

Johann Elias Ridinger, Gutting of the Hare

“ The hare is chased, framed by the hounds and seized, immediately expectorated, those hounds given their right and the hide skinned at home. ”

“ If the noble stag has perished he is gutted, the entrails taken out, the right foreleg detached, handed over to the piqueur, and by the same presented to the master and mistress. ”

THE PICTORIALLY AS THEMATICALLY RICH PENDANTS

arched at top whose stag sheet L’Art Ancien 1939 (list 14, no. 30 with ills.) described on occasion of the offer of the Schwerdt drawing above in spaced type as

“ One of the most beautiful Ridinger plates . ”

After only recent passing through of a copy – previous intervals up to 13 years! – the old omnibus volume from the estate of a nobleman come in unexpectedly revealed what is what and rested concealed through the centuries. Here then, numbered by old hand above the platemark XI & XII, on uniform, yet variedly strong laid paper with typographic watermark, the slightly lighter one’s WANGEN as the quality particularly esteemed by the Ridingers. – The hare sheet partially inked a little too much, the right lower corner of the stag sheet somewhat age spotted. – Margins above & below 4.8-5.4, laterally 1.9-2.8 cm wide, at the left the old stitching edge. – See the complete description.

Offer no. 15,704 / EUR  1700. / export price EUR  1615. (c. US$ 1762.) + shipping

Well trained

Well Trained. Hound bringing a hare to the hunter meanwhile fallen asleep under an oak. Wood engraving by Jules Huyot (Toulouse 1841 – Eaubonne 1921) after Henri Télory (Strasbourg 1820 – 1874/75). (1873.) Inscribed: Telory / Huyot, otherwise in German as above. 5⅝ × 8⅜ in (14.2 × 21.2 cm).

Offer no. 11,180 / EUR  69. (c. US$ 75.) + shipping

The Hunt’s Fine Close

A Unicum from Famous Stable

Rugendas, Georg Philipp II (1701 Augsburg 1774). Hunting Luck. Young hunter with his two hounds, propped over boar & hare laid down at the foot of a tree growing from a boulder. Sketched hilly landscape background with further tree. Pen & brush drawing in brown-black and grey resp. over occasional pencil, grey wash. Inscribed with the pen lower left below the fine border, both in brown ink: G. P. Rug. Junior. invenit A1736. 9⅞ × 7⅜ in (252 × 188 mm).

On strong Jean Villedary laid paper (“IV ILLEDARY”), the paper mill prospering for 150 years in Angoulême (acc. to Churchill, 1935, p. 21 from 1668 to 1758) and then in resumption or as a branch at Hattem/Netherlands, “sometimes in conjunction with the names of Dutch paper-makers” (Emma Ruffle) where his IV/I V for instance appears as countermark to the ones of C & I HONIG (about 1724/26-1902), but generally also abused as pirated mark like others standing for first qualities, too. In Augsburg “IV” papers were estimated by both Rugendas – as then just here, too – and Ridinger. – Under acid-free passepartout with 23.5-carat gilt stamped artist’s name and dates.

The in every detail typical signature probably somewhat paled, on the back below not shining through into the subject the diagonally set S-sequence of a child’s printing set with touch of an attempt of cure, otherwise perfectly fresh and mounted at the edges onto a cutout.

Motif-beautiful work

Georg Philipp II Rugendas, Hunting Luck

determined by the softness of its brush technique ,

so Gode Krämer in the 1998 Augsburg Rugendas catalog (p. 45/II) on occasion of other works of the younger Georg Philipp, sensitively executed and with dainty wash, as representing the best of his drawings. “His strength lies in the careful, picturewise execution” (Krämer, op. cit., 46/I). Usually he worked after his father’s designs and those of third parties, especially also after Johann Heinrich Roos.

Present work seems to be based on an idea of his father’s. So by the Brazilian Johann Moriz Rugendas (1802-1858) as the last one of the painter dynasty there exists a youthful detail lithograph “Killed Game” (cat. Augsburg 259 with ills.) with the source inscription “G. P. Rugendas 1709”. Its upper half shows a roe lying diagonally across a boar, both laid against the trunk of a tree, at what the present composition with boar/hare reminds. That model drawing, however, is “neither signed nor dated, so that the inscription of the lithograph must be based on family tradition”.

Present left-sided boulder-tree accessories in their turn refer to the left-sided part of the 1724 drawing in his own hand of a stag hunt executed in the same technique (no. 159 of the catalog with ills.). In the printed œuvre we encounter it on the right side in the mezzotint Teuscher 362 with the bull held down by two hounds of the 4-sheet set “Hunt and Killed Game”, likewise with hilly light background, while for the two boar hounds the one of T. 472 of a 4-sheet set of hounds could be referred to. As a whole though neither thought stag hunt nor present drawing find any correspondence in the own engraved work nor in that of the family.

They are works sui generis ,

the former annotated by Gode Krämer as “one of the freest and easiest drawings” of the younger Georg Philipp. And present one already excels just thematically. Motifs with the hunter and his hunting luck are generally rare. Here then as the sole content of the subject. From famous stable.

Without glass & frame

Offer no. 15,182 / price on application

Shot Hare

(Hare, Shot.) Lying before grass. Wood engraving after the monogramist TB. (1873.) 8.5 x 12.5 cm.

Offer no. 11,171 / EUR  25. (c. US$ 27.) + shipping

« The hare has a great many enemies,

but the worst is man …

and if the doe would breed only once a year

and not three or even four times ,

no hare would live on earth anymore ,

for his enemies are too many ,

since his game is too delicate »

Hermann Löns, Der Feldhase


“ Hello Mr. Niemeyer, Parcel well received! Interesting (Ridinger) piece! Appreciate your good memory and service! Best regards ”

(Mr. J. R. L., July 17, 2012)