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Appreciated at last —
the Easter, pardon, Spring Bunny

March Hares

Animal of the Year 2015

“ The Hare will be Master of the Earth ,
for his is the greatest fertility
and the purest heart ”

Hermann Löns, Twilight of the Hares

There Master Hare can bask his hide in the March sun twice as snugly in the fresh green.

Snugger? Well, there Master Hare is too sage not to know that this honor bestowed on him by the do-gooders won’t keep any of his enemies, may they come along on four paws, with soft wings and a hard beak, or two-legged-double-barreled, out of his hair.

“ One cannot see Anything Nicer
but the Hare
moving from the Field into the Wood ”

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Common Brown Hare. Surrounded by manifold green. “A nice picture, in fitting environs Master Hare sits in the midst with the head turned sideways (to the right)” (Th.). Colored etching/engraving, supposedly by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: LEPVS campestris. / Gemeiner Feld-Hase. / Lievre. / Familia III. Vierzähige. / Ridinger fec. 11⅞ × 8 in (30.1 × 20.2 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 1043. – IN  THE  RIDINGERS’  ORIGINAL  COLORING  from the unnumbered Colored Animal Kingdom created since 1754 and concluded finally posthumously not before 1773 (“Complete copies are next to untraceable”, so Weigel, Art Cat., part XXVIII, Ridinger Appendix 63a as merely 120-sheet torso, 1857 ! , but also just individual plates quite rarely on the market only, at niemeyer’s presently nevertheless the one as the others). – Remaining uncolored contrary to the prospectus, a second edition from the plates shortened even under loss of animals and with modified titling and the Ridinger inscription removed, yet now numbered, was published by Engelbrecht/Herzberg in Augsburg 1824/25.

Ridinger, Brown Hare

“ Indeed one finds diverse foreign kinds of these animals; yet since we lack true and exact representations of these, we rather intend to stay with our known home kind … Anyway, this animal is a very lively, yet also very timid creature. Of the wild species hares we have delivered here three illustrations, that is a common reddish one, a white one, and one spotted, which furthermore was cornuted; however, both the latter kinds are something rare. These animals breed, as is known, very much … Therefore their numbers would be inexpressibly large if on the other hand they had not many enemies and both the beasts and birds of prey and man reduced their number so considerably. One cannot see anything nicer but the hare moving from the field into the wood ”

(Ridinger’s sons in the preamble to pt. II in German and French, pp. 3 & 2 f. resp., enclosed in copy). – And Thienemann:

“ The forefeet are five-toed, the hind ones four-toed, therefore Ridinger has set it into the third, yet Klein into the fourth family. ”

The fine sujet in its vibrant colorfulness

with watermark C & I Honig, similar to Heawood 3346 & 3348, as that sturdy Dutch quality paper Ridinger used in line with his preamble to the Principal Colors of Horses

“on account of the fine illumination” for the colored works

“as for this purpose it is the most decent and best”.

The attribution of the transfer into copper to presumably Johann Elias’ eldest on the basis of the sole inscription “Ridinger fec.”. – Margins on three sides 2-3.5 cm, below 5.5 cm wide.

Offer no. 15,904 / EUR  430. / export price EUR  409. (c. US$ 446.) + shipping

Johann Elias Ridinger, Trace of a Hare

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Trace of a Hare / * in soft ground. / Fore Leg.* / Fore Leg on Solid Ground / Hind Leg.* / Hind Leg on Solid Ground. Brown hare stopping on the narrow clearing of a dense deciduous forest. Below the picture the life size traces marked in addition specifically for the claws. Etching and engraving. (1740.) Inscribed: 13. / Joh. El. Ridinger inven. delineav. sculps. et excudit Aug. Vindel., otherwise in German as above. 14¾ × 11¾ in (37.4 × 29.8 cm).

REPRESENTATION OF THE FAIR GAME 13. – Thienemann & Schwarz 175; Ridinger catalog Darmstadt (1999), III.25 with illustration; Sälzle, facsimile ed. of all drawings for the set, 1980, pp. 44 f. (dated 1737) & pl. XXIX.

Johann Elias Ridinger, Trace of a Hare

“ On the etched sheet the (single) hare trace (of the preparatory drawing below the picture) is replaced by traces of the hare in soft and on solid ground ” (Sälzle).

That on the separate drawing with the four traces (Sälzle plate XXIX) – as then also transferred onto the early prints still numbered by hand – Ridinger mixed up the foreleg with the hind leg twice by erroneous assignment of the specified symbols x and # is missed by Sälzle. Such a proof figured with Helbing (Ridinger catalog XXXIV; 1900) as lot 356. On the corresponding sheet of Ridinger’s personal copy here of exclusive proofs for sheets 1-20 the master has corrected this oversight by specially engraved little cover sheets as documented so far here as unique.

Uniquely beautiful impression of the now correct final state with watermark WANGEN as one of the sturdy laid paper qualities preferred by Ridinger. – Margins above & below 3.1-4.9 cm wide, on the left 1.4, on the right 0.1-0.3 cm margin resp., each in addition to the wide white platemark. – Lower margin far right slightly finger-spotted from turning over, some tiny spots also centrally of the far edge.

Offer no. 15,808 / EUR  630. / export price EUR  599. (c. US$ 653.) + shipping

– – – The same as rotogravure postcard by O. Felsing, Charlottenburg (Berlin). C. 1900/20. 5⅜ × 3⅝ in (13.8 × 9.3 cm). – Unused “ARTIST CARD”.

Offer no. 28,470 / EUR  29. (c. US$ 32.) + shipping

“ Who sees this Picture judiciously ,
will and has to praise the Master ”

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Liévre male et femelle deviennent grandes apres deux ans. The Hare, a Buck and the Doe reach their Size in the First Year. “In the background a splendid park, (front left) a doe with a herd of young ones of various age, the buck sits up drolly in the center, one more shows us the back.” Etching and engraving. (1736.) Inscribed: 26. / Cum Priv. Sac. Cæs. Majest. / I. El. Ridinger invent. delin. Sculps. et excud. Aug. Vindel., otherwise as above in German, French, Latin, & below. 13⅝ × 16½ in (34.6 × 42 cm).

Johann Elias Ridinger, The Hare, a Buck and the Doe

Thienemann & Schwarz 221. – Sheet 26 of the STUDY OF THE WILD ANIMALS with the caption of the Hamburg pope of poets, jurist & senator, yet foremost friend of Ridinger’s, Barthold Heinrich Brockes (1680-1747), in German. – With WANGEN watermark as so characteristic for contemp. impressions. – Margins on three sides 3.6-4.8, below 2.8 cm wide. – The utterly smoothed centerfold reinforced on the back. Smoothed diagonal fold upper right in the white margin, laterally right outside of the platemark also small rust spot.

“ If we look at the pricked up ears of the raised buck , everything suits this little male so drolly , That one could barely help laughing deafeningly … ”

And not least and by chance already in 1901 Ernst Welisch qualified Ridinger as the  indisputably  “most  important  Augsburg  landscapist  of this time”. Here then

of shining-marvelous quality & therefore rarity ,

for even in exemplary old Ridinger collections the old impressions of particularly this so fine large-sized main set frequently figure as closely trimmed, damaged, and fully mounted. So including present one in the Silesian collection 1885 at Boerner & 1894 with Reich auf Biehla, while the sheet had remained a desideratum to Coppenrath (1889).

Offer no. 15,402 / EUR  690. / export price EUR  656. (c. US$ 716.) + shipping

Hares & Yellow-Hammer

Hares. Three of them in high grass at the edge of the wood together with a yellow-hammer. Wood engraving after Adolf (? 1825 Leipsic 1884) Neumann. (1876.) 19.5 x 23.6 cm. – With text sheet in German.

Offer no. 11,665 / EUR  65. (c. US$ 71.) + shipping

“ … both the Latter Kinds
are Something Rare ”

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). White Hare. Coming from undergrowth, scenting to the left. Colored etching/engraving, supposedly by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: LEPVS albus. / Weißer Hase. / Lievre blanc. / Familia III. Vierzähige. / Riding. fec. 12 × 8⅛ in (30.6 × 20.7 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 1044. – IN  THE  RIDINGERS’  ORIGINAL  COLORING  from the unnumbered Colored Animal Kingdom created since 1754 and concluded finally posthumously not before 1773 (“Complete copies are next to untraceable”, so Weigel, Art Cat., part XXVIII, Ridinger Appendix 63a as merely 120-sheet torso, 1857 ! , but also just individual plates quite rarely on the market only, at niemeyer’s presently nevertheless the one as the others). – Remaining uncolored contrary to the prospectus, a second edition from the plates shortened even under loss of animals and with modified titling and the Ridinger inscription removed, yet now numbered, was published by Engelbrecht/Herzberg in Augsburg 1824/25.

Ridinger, White Hare

“ Of the wild species hares we have delivered here three illustrations, that is a common reddish one, a white one, and one spotted, which furthermore was cornuted; however, both the latter kinds are something rare ”

(Ridinger’s sons in the preamble to pt. II in German and French, pp. 3 & 2 f. resp., enclosed in copy). – And Thienemann:

“ White it is in the winter coat, otherwise it resembles the common one, and represents an own species

which lives in the Alps .”

The fine sujet in its vibrant colorfulness

with watermark C & I Honig, similar to Heawood 3346 & 3348, as that sturdy Dutch quality paper Ridinger used in line with his preamble to the Principal Colors of Horses

“on account of the fine illumination” for the colored works

“as for this purpose it is the most decent and best”.

The attribution of the transfer into copper to presumably Johann Elias’ eldest on the basis of the sole inscription “Riding. fec.” with at the same time rarer omission of the “er”, as with the plate of the rabbits, Th. 1046, too. The Brown Hare as well as the Cornuted Hare (Th. 1043 and 1045 resp.) each with written-out Ridinger. – Margins on three sides 2-3 cm, below 4.9 cm wide.

Offer no. 15,905 / EUR  470. / export price EUR  447. (c. US$ 488.) + shipping

Menaces to a Hare's Life

“ The Hare has a Great Many Enemies ,
but the Worst is Man ”

(Hare, Oh! Am I not a Poor Little?) All menaces to a hare’s life, from snares, weasel, fox, wolf, cat, and birds of prey – of the latter even several with feeding at the aerie – up to the larded roast with red wine after the battue in the center field. Wood engraving by Jules Huyot (Toulouse 1841 – Eaubonne 1921) after Ph. Müller. (1873.) Inscribed: Ph. Müller / Huyot, otherwise typographically in German as above and 3-column distich after an old song. 8⅞ × 12¼ in (22.5 × 31.2 cm). – Barely perceptible faint foxing top left within the subject and at the center of the caption.

“ The hare has a great many enemies, but the worst is man … and if the doe would breed only once a year and not three or even four times, no hare would live on earth anymore, for his enemies are too many, since his game is too delicate ”

(Hermann Löns, [The Brown Hare]).

Offer no. 12,498 / EUR  97. (c. US$ 106.) + shipping

The Leeheim Hare
or about the
Sensuality of a Superb Set of Teeth

Johann Elias Ridinger (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). This Hare with Indicated Rare Teeth has been shot in the Forest of Leeheim 4 Hours from Darmstadt Oct. 25, 1753. Printing-plate in reverse. (1754/56.) Inscribed: Joh. El. Ridinger del. fec. et excud. A. V., otherwise in German as before. 13⅜ × 10⅛ in (34.1 × 25.6 cm).

The optically excellently preserved

Ridinger, Hare with rare Teeth

original printing-plate

to sheet 64 (etching & engraving, Thienemann & Schwarz 306; Ridinger Catalog Darmstadt, 1999, VI.6 with ills.; Siebert-Weitz, Ridinger – Bilder zur Jagd in Hessen-Darmstadt, 1999, pp. 34 f. with ills.) of the Representation of the Wondrous Stags and other Animals.

“ The comparably small though marked hare with carefully treated coat sits in front of a light rock to which again the knobby, half withered group of trees … contrasts … (It) has been shot in the Leeheim forest (west of Darmstadt, district Groß-Gerau, today belonging to Riedstadt). Its incisors were grown out of the mouth both above and below. The incisors of the hares do not stop growing when they reached the necessary size. As they are subject to great stress they have permanent growth. If for any reason they are no longer stressed they nevertheless grow forth without this resulting in the soon death of the hare. Thus the

very rare abnormity

as on the sheet worked by Ridinger emerges ”

(Siebert-Weitz).

The latter refer to a preserved carved head of a hare with the teeth and that the work forms a pair with the “Stag with the Lob-Ears” shot by landgrave Louis VIII in the environs of Darmstadt August 20, 1754, (sheet 63; Th. 305; Cat. Darmstadt VI.5 & Siebert-Weitz pp. 32 f. – “Belongs together with no. 64” – , both with ills.).

Negative report, however, for further memorabilia in Catalog Darmstadt:

“ Just as of the ‘snub-eared’ main boar (sheet 58; Th. 300; Cat. D. VI.4 & S.-W. 30 f., each with ills.) there are no further evidences of this rare animal in the inventory of the hunting seat Kranichstein. ”

Sheltered from tarnishing by fine application of varnish

the plate is printable generally in the ordinary course of its use during the times. But it is offered and sold as a work of art and an object of collecting. Thus without prejudice to its final printing quality. – Shortly ,

a conceivably enjoying , worldwide unique absolutum .

Proposed to you with the recommendation of a timeless-elegantly frameless hanging (fittings included) for that you will experience the reflection of the respective light to the fullest.

Offer no. 15,001 / price on application

Ludwig Beckmann, Hares taken by Surprise

Beckmann, Ludwig (Hanover 1822 – Dusseldorf 1902). Hares Taken by Surprise. Three in the cabbage before grain through which Reynard the Fox already scents. Wood engraving by G. Treibmann for the Xylographic Institute of Richard Brend’amour (Aix-la-Chapelle 1831 – Dusseldorf 1915). (1873.) 20 x 26 cm.

Offer no. 11,183 / EUR  84. (c. US$ 92.) + shipping

With Eight Legs One runs longer

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Anno 1741. this Hare with 8 Legs and 2 hind Quarters has been shot in its burrow on the so-called Stickelsberg near Meisselhausen. Standing on a grotto before rich foliage. Etching with engraving. Inscribed: 60. / Joh. El. Ridinger del. sculps. et excud. Aug. Vind. 1753., otherwise in German as above. 13¼ × 10 in (33.8 × 25.5 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 302; Ridinger Catalog Darmstadt, 1999, VI.19 with ills. – Sheet 60 of the Representation of the Most Wondrous Stags and Other Animals. – The subject itself arched above. – Margins above & below 7.5-8.5, laterally 4.4-4.9 cm wide.

Johann Elias Ridinger, Hare with 8 legs

“ (E)xperience teaches, that there are many freaks, or monstrosities, with the species of hares, e. g.

hares with eight legs , two heads , four ears and the like … ”

(Georg Ludwig Hartig, Lehrbuch für Jäger, I [1812], p. 171).

However, the eight-legged hare came to great fame by the tale, based – contrary to many other – on Hieronymus Carl Frdr. von Münchhausen’s (Bodenwerder, Weser, 1720-1797) own report:

“ Since I hunted a hare for two whole days … Finally though the hare came that near to me … He fell down, and what do you think what I found now? – Four legs my hare had below the body and four on the back. When the two lower pairs were tired then he turned … around, and now it went on with the new ones with enhanced speed. Never again I have found a hare of this kind … ”

(Gottfried August Bürger – ancestor on the mother’s side here – , [Marvelous Travels … and Comical Adventures of the Baron of Münchhausen], Leipsic, Dieterich, 1954, p. 27). – On the possibility of a relation to the German Münchhausen tale Mr. Heppell of the Dpt. of Natural History of the Royal Scottish Museum pointed out on occasion of an earlier visit.

Offer no. 15,603 / EUR  530. / export price EUR  504. (c. US$ 550.) + shipping

Population of the Hunting Grounds

Hunting Grounds, Population of the. Setting out of the rabbits, driven up in several baskets, in the district, to the joy of both the master as his hound. Wood engraving by Jules Huyot (Toulouse 1841 – Eaubonne 1921) after Henri Télory (Strasbourg 1820 – 1874/75). (1873.) Inscribed: Telory / Huyot, otherwise in German as above. 9 × 12⅜ in (23 × 31.4 cm). – In the white margin faintly age-spotted.

“ Three months passed and the pine nursery looked different from that day in April the gamekeeper had released the rabbits. Everywhere there was pawed … The tenant of the hunt rejoiced when in twilight in the raised hide in the oak he turned the glass to the ditch and the rabbits shot about everywhere, but he was surprised that the strong buck, who otherwise always stepped out here, no longer made scents. But for him it had become too noisy in the nursery and the pole wood … Therefore he had emigrated to the neighboring hunt.

Also both the hares had disappeared

which otherwise browsed each night right in front in the clover meadow … since Hopps, Witschel and Flitzchen and their offspring and the offspring of these and their offspring and so on had been in the heath hills, by and by the hares had made themselves scarce, and the roes had changed into the neighboring hunt, which consisted of marsh and moor forest and in which the rabbits could not exist ”

(Hermann Löns, The Immigrants).

Offer no. 11,174 / EUR  95. (c. US$ 104.) + shipping

“ Even Cornuted Hares
are said to have existed … ”

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Black-spotted Hare. With Horns. Running to the right on a path along a fence. Colored etching/engraving, supposedly by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: LEPVS cum Maculis nigris. Cornutus. / Schwarz gefleckter Hase. Mit Hörner. / Lievre tacheté. cornu. / Familia III. Vierzähige. / Ridinger fec. 12 × 7⅞ in (30.4 × 20.1 cm).

Thienemann & Schwarz 1045. – DJM 5912 with illustration p. 158 merely from the uncolored new edition of 1824/25. – IN  THE  RIDINGERS’  ORIGINAL  COLORING  from the unnumbered Colored Animal Kingdom created since 1754 and concluded finally posthumously not before 1773 (“Complete copies are next to untraceable”, so Weigel, Art Cat., part XXVIII, Ridinger Appendix 63a as merely 120-sheet torso, 1857 ! , but also just individual plates quite rarely on the market only, at niemeyer’s presently nevertheless the one as the others). – Remaining uncolored contrary to the prospectus, a second edition from the plates shortened even under loss of animals and with modified titling and the Ridinger inscription removed, yet now numbered, was published by Engelbrecht/Herzberg in Augsburg 1824/25.

Ridinger, Cornuted Hare

“ Of the wild species hares we have delivered here three illustrations, that is a common reddish one, a white one, and one spotted, which furthermore was cornuted; however, both the latter kinds are something rare ”

(Ridinger’s sons in the preamble to pt. II in German and French, pp. 3 & 2 f. resp., enclosed in copy).

“ The cornuted hare ghosts through our hunt literature since the year 1602. Quite nice, too, what Mr. Buffon has to tell about:

‘Now and then lawless nature brings forth against her habit cornigerous hens, hinds, and does, therefore supposedly cornuted or deer hares, too … The famous naturalist of Danzig, Mr. Klein ( on whose collection Ridinger repeatedly drew for his Colored Animal Kingdom )

himself has owned such antlers in his collection

and Balbinus asserts, in the Norwegian it were not entirely uncommon to see suchlike animals’ … ”

(DJM, op. cit., page 158). – And Hartig, Lehrbuch für Jäger, I (1812), 171:

“ Even cornuted hares are said to have existed. Yet I have to confess that I greatly doubt it, albeit experience teaches, that there are many freaks, or monstrosities, with the species of hares, e. g. hares with eight legs, two heads, four ears and the like … ”

Just as then already by his 1798 Neujahrs-Geschenk the electoral Hesse head forestry superintendent von Wildungen had shown himself converted from his original disbelief (p. 6):

“ However, since I have begun to collect more carefully everything that has been written or said ever since about this almost entirely inexplicable aberration of nature, I finally begin to convert from this disbelief, too. ”

To get two decades later, after comprehensive documentation of both supporting and doubting and refusing sources in literature as well as own dismissal of the roebuck-like hare antlers – as with present one, too (“Thus we find the animal illustrated, however, if in a cabinet, in nature one has never found such one”, Th.) – , finally at the real core of the matter:

“ However, that every so often such one might have been found, whose head indeed had distinguished itself, certainly not by true horns and even less by real antlers, but by outwardly hornlike excrescencies (exotosis) of the frontal bone – (still remarkable enough)! – I will by no means pronounce impossible ”

(L. C. E. H. F. von Wildungen, Weidmanns Feierabende, vol. 3 [1817], p. 59).

With watermark C & I Honig, similar to Heawood 3346 & 3348, as that sturdy Dutch quality paper Ridinger used in line with his preamble to the Principal Colors of Horses

“on account of the fine illumination” for the colored works

“as for this purpose it is the most decent and best”.

The attribution of the transfer into copper to presumably Johann Elias’ eldest on the basis of the sole inscription “Ridinger fec.”. – Margins on three sides 2-3.5 cm, below 5.5 cm wide.

Offer no. 15,906 / EUR  535. / export price EUR  508. (c. US$ 554.) + shipping

« Oh Oh »
Johann Elias Ridinger, Oh Oh
« The Night Owls
consumed a Poor Little Hare …»

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). OH OH. The night owls consumed a poor little hare, so soon cats come along, too, and liked to take them together with the hare, there it is about hairs so about feathers. An eagle owl – Thienemann comments – , sitting on a captured hare, is attacked by two cats which want to take the hare from it. Above a second owl is about to fly down and prevent the heist.

ADDED the complimentary piece: WORLD WORLD. The foxes fetched a banquet in the hen-house, yet at once dogs were set on them, and thus it is about feathers so about hairs. Two foxes – Thienemann comments – , one takes to his heels with a hen in the mouth, the other has dropped the killed cock to defend himself against a dog. Two further packers hurrying down an elevation to take part in the battle.

2 sheet as lively wall-fitting sceneries

in fine hilly water landscape under the full moon, located each at the opposite end of the same pond. Etching with engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: XXXIV. and XXXIII. resp. / Joh. El. Ridinger. del: et inv(in): 1753. / M. El. Ridinger. Filio suo. sp. 1777, otherwise in German as before and below. 13⅛ × 9¾ in (33.3 × 24.8 cm).

Thienemann + Schwarz 376 & 377; Silesian Ridinger collection at Boerner XXXIX, within 1887 ( “New impressions”, 1885!); Reich auf Biehla Collection 118 & 119 ( “Rare”, 1894!; pl. 34 trimmed to platemark); Helbing XXXIV, Works by J. E. and M. E. Ridinger, 892 & 893 (pl. 34: “Rare”, 1900! ).

Each one rare on its own already 120 years ago —

yet here both together !!

The pair XXXIII/XXXIV with wave-shaped arched top of the 46-sheet set To the Special Events and Incidents at the Hunt (“The rarest set of Ridinger’s sporting line engravings”, Schwerdt 1928, and, so Thienemann, “arranged almost throughout so that always two by two harmonize with each other and form pendants, just as they have been sold in pairs, too” ) etched exclusively by Martin Elias after predominantly his father’s designs and concluded in 1779.

The captions quoted above supplemented by the mottos

“ Oh Oh =
There is no end to robbing and killing ,
and so outrage becomes the third sin . ”

“ World World —
All brave bachelors are burdensome to the belles ,
but the latter in their turn often dangerous to the former ”

on which Thienemann remarks laconically “Yet how the maidens and bachelors fit in here Ridinger may know”.

The motif of the eagle owls besides doubtlessly inspired Friedrich Gauermann (1807-1862) to his oil Fight between Foxes and an Eagle about a Dead Snow Grouse (Boetticher 64) then in the collection Prince Liechtenstein.

Wide-margined impressions of vibrant chiaroscuro originating from the omnibus volume of the old estate of a nobleman on firm laid paper with typographic watermark as one of Ridinger’s preferred qualities

with the Roman numbers

(“If they are missing, so this points to later impressions”, Th.). – In the far white upper margin still both the two pinholes from the original stitching in numbers, at the far right edge of pl. 34 small tidemark. – See the complete description.

Offer no. 15,820 / EUR  1780. / export price EUR  1691. (c. US$ 1845.) + shipping


“ I have received the copy of Schoenberg’s Harmonielehre … I am very pleased with it. Thank you very much for your help ”

(Mrs. C. C., March 7, 2003)