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Now  it’s  all  about  the  Holiday  Roasting

for  which  niemeyer’s  wishes  you  a  blessed  appetite ,
embedded in also otherwise round about fine days and
as solid foundation for a harmonic turn of the year
as prelude to a healthy, and thus good, new year
fulfilling wishes and having lots of pleasure in store.

Johann Elias Ridinger, The one who brings the Christmas Goose

and  the  one  who  brings  it

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). What a Wickedness it is the Fox Commits here! Reynard the Fox, a goose by the neck, ascending a manorial outside staircase in a wood lined with rocks. Etching + engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: XXII. / Ridinger, sculps., otherwise in German as before and below. 34 x 24.6 cm.

Thienemann + Schwarz 365; Helbing XXXIV, Arbeiten von J. E. und M. E. Ridinger, 880: “Very rare” (1900). – Sheet XXII of the 46-sheet set To the Special Events and Incidents at the Hunt ( “The rarest set of Ridinger’s sporting line engravings”, Schwerdt 1928) etched exclusively by Martin Elias after predominantly his father’s designs and concluded posthumously in 1779. – In the white upper margin the two tiny pinholes of the original issue and pairwise resp. stitching (harmonizing exactly to the dot: sheet XXIII, Th. 366, of the chamois driven to death by a couple of bearded vultures as just the feathereds’ revenge for Reynard’s outrage here, because

“ He  is  after  innocent  birds  with  cunning  tricks .

And so you, o! human, also have distressed your God, Who by the prey of the animals leads you on his revenge.”

Shining  marvelous  impression  of  the  first  edition

with  the  Roman  number

(“If they are missing, so this indicates later impressions”, Th.)

with  provenance  Von  Behr  of  the  House  Stellichte

assumedly purchased directly from the Ridingers between 1768 + before 1779, so just at times of foundation of the United States. The German Von Behr family itself reaching back far into the centuries. I. a. already in 1470 – 29 years before Columbus! – it was enfeoffed with the water castle in Stellichte, Lower Saxon, as the ancestral seat up to date.

The margins of three sides 2.8-6.2 cm wide, on the left 2.5 cm, 1 cm of which formerly folded stitching margin with tiny stitching hole. Helbing’s copy then “with almost full margin” only. In also impeccable condition and thus of agreed rarity.

Offer no. 14,468 / sold

– – – A new copy in wide-margined impression with the Roman number (“If they are missing, so this indicates later impressions”, Th.) originating from the omnibus volume of the old estate of a nobleman. – Cut old number in bister in the upper left corner. – See the complete description.

Offer no. 15,715 / EUR  808. / export price EUR  768. (c. US$ 837.) + shipping

Just  letting  go  with  all  Barrels
makes  no  Goose  a  Game …

Heubner, Friedrich (Dresden 1886 – before 1955). The Swell. Rowed by a good fellow into the reed for goose – but so far only the shot cartridge cases fill the boat. Pen and ink with wash. Inscribed: F H (19)19. 10¾ × 7½ in (273 × 190 mm).

Friedrich Heubner, The Swell

“For  god’s  sake  Mister  Hunzelmeier ,
why  you  always  shoot  both  barrels  at  once --- ?
(?) – why  not  I  can  afford  it -- !”

Vollmer II, 436. – Cartoon from Heubner’s (the “F” of the monogram here readable as “T”) time in Munich, so editor’s note, for the “(Youth)” or one of the other illustrated papers for which he worked. Title + caption – in German – in pencil by supposedly a member of the editors.

Heubner was pupil of Julius Diez at the arts-and-crafts school in Munich, then, i. a. with Emil Preetorius, member of the working group of the “6”, “which aimed at a renewal of advertising art. 1932/40 professor for free graphics at the state school for applied arts in Nuremberg”, then at the corresponding academy in Munich.

Offer no. 12,050 / EUR  291. / export price EUR  276. (c. US$ 301.) + shipping

… then  rather  have  Professional  Ridinger  catching  it

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Anno 1719. This extra Large Wild Goose has been caught Alive by this Princely Pointer near  Maul=brunn  on a Pool in the Reed. Large happening in the foreground, embedded into rich scenery ashore. Etching + engraving. Inscribed: J. El. Rüdinger (sic!) del. sculps. et excud., otherwise in German as above. 1745. 14½ × 11 in (36.8 × 28.1 cm).

Johann Elias Ridinger, Wild Goose near Maulbronn

Thienemann + Schwarz 278; Ortega y Gasset, (Meditations on the Hunt), 1981, full-page ills. p. 29. – Sheet 36 of the Wondrous Stags and other Animals. – Thematically as sheet 7 includable to the at first 4, then also 6-sheet set of the Pointers Th. 101-104 + 274, 328 + 308, of, however, larger size than the main set.

Offer no. 12,068 / EUR  649. / export price EUR  617. (c. US$ 672.) + shipping

Though  not  everyone  also  retrieves  it …

… for  Roast  Goose  tastes  others  just  as  fine

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). A wicked enemy has here frightened the wild goose; She was hidden with her breed in secure reed. She believed herself quite free of all surprise; But the  polecat  knows to be after her secretly. He attacks her boldly, does not hear her screams, His hunger is satisfied; he is happy besides. In thick reeds, one of the parents taking off, the chicken fleeing, set back a property. Etching + engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). Inscribed: XIV. / Ioh. El. Ridinger, inv. et del. / Mart. El. Ridinger, sculps. A. V., otherwise in German as before. 28.3 x 26.4 cm.

Thienemann + Schwarz 357. – Sheet XIV of the 46-sheet set To the Special Events and Incidents at the Hunt ( “The rarest set of Ridinger’s sporting line engravings”, Schwerdt 1928) etched exclusively by Martin Elias after predominantly his father’s designs and concluded posthumously in 1779. – The set itself “arranged almost throughout so that always two by two harmonize with each other and form pendants, just as they have been sold in pairs, too” (Th.). Belonging to here sheet XV, the wild he-cats’ heron hunt.

Marvelously  warm-toned  impression  of  the  first  edition

with  the  Roman  number

(“If they are missing, so this indicates later impressions”, Th.)

with  provenance  Von  Behr  of  the  House  Stellichte

as at the beginning. – Arched at top. – Margins above + below 7.5 cm wide and here in the far part most minimally slightly fox-spotted, the sides 1.5 cm and on the far left with small stitching traces.

Offer no. 14,489 / sold

– – – In a new copy together with the companion piece Wicked is the he-cat’s trick in wide-margined impressions with the Roman number (“If they are missing, so this indicates later impressions”, Th.) originating from the omnibus volume of the old estate of a nobleman. – Cut old number in bister in the upper left corner. – See the complete description.

Offer no. 15,819 / EUR  1680. / export price EUR  1596. (c. US$ 1739.) + shipping

And  so  the  end  of  the  story  sounds

“ Fox , you  stole  my  goosey  gander ,

Give  him  back  to  me ,

Else  I’ll  call  Count  Öhringen

Who’ll  shoot  you  with  glee ”

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). In the Year 1720. His Excellency Sire Count of Ohringen (Hohenlohe-Öhringen) has shot this entirely white fox himself close to Ohrenthal (near Öhringen on the Ohrn in the Ohrn district). “The white fox hangs by one of the hind legs, beside him a strong greyhound lashed up, before one sleeping and still three other hounds” (Th.). With 18.5 cm quite instructive-dominating on the left the extremely long flint-lock gun by which the white one was bagged and on the barrel of which he now hangs. Etching & engraving. (1750/53.) Inscribed: Joh. El. Ridinger Sculps. et excud. Aug. Vind., otherwise in German as above. 13⅝ × 9⅞ in (34.7 × 25 cm).

Johann Elias Ridinger, White Fox of Öhringen

Thienemann & Schwarz 298; Ortega y Gasset, (Meditations on the Hunt), Stuttgart 1981, full-page ills. p. 65. – Sheet 56 of the Wondrous Stags and other Animals and like the following four other plates there with linings arched at top. – Lower and partly right outer margin barely disturbingly spotted.

Offer no. 12,073 / EUR  698. / export price EUR  663. (c. US$ 722.) + shipping

– – – The same from the final complete edition, Leipsic c. 1859. 13⅝ × 9⅝ in (34.5 × 24.5 cm). – On toned vélin with margins of 1.8-2 cm all round, drawing impeccably clear and vibrant still in the subtlest italics.

Offer no. 16,101 / EUR  168. (c. US$ 183.) + shipping

But  all  you  geese  which  you  then  have  been  left

in  the  year  of  grace  2004

listen  to  the  owl

for  it  is  not  just  the  bird  of  wisdom ,

but , AHA , also

the  Bird  of  the  Year  2005

Ridinger, Johann Elias (Ulm 1698 – Augsburg 1767). Innocence is often saved through the Hatred of the Evil. An owl once cheated by the fox warns “a flock of wild geese” to praise the death of Reynard the Fox as guaranteed. Etching + engraving by Martin Elias Ridinger (1731 Augsburg 1780). After 1767. Inscribed: J. El. Ridinger. inv. et del. / M. El. Ridinger. sc. et exc: A. V., otherwise in German, Latin, and French as before. 13¼ × 9¾ in (33.6 × 24.7 cm).

Johann Elias Ridinger, Innocence is often saved through the Hatred of the Evil

Thienemann + Schwarz 781; Metzner-Raabe, Illustr. Fabelbuch, 1998, vol. II (Bodemann), 123.I. – Sheet 17 of the Fables. – Small figurative watermark. – The repeated “.” after Ridinger missing in Schwarz who besides mentions a “:” after FABUL instead of the simple dot here. – Additionally to the fine white platemark with also wide paper margin on two sides. In the narrower left one old traces of stitching.

The  exceptionally  rare  first  supplementary  sheet

of the intellectually as optically exceedingly charming “Instructive Fables from the Animal Kingdom for Improvement of the Manners and especially for Instruction of the Youth” by which

“ Ridinger pursued a typical purpose of his epoch. A ‘Correction of Manners’ by the morale efficacy of art – albeit in a quite different manner – William Hogarth, almost of the same age as Ridinger, had attempted by his paintings and prints … Yet while Hogarth and Chodowiecki tried to gain recognition for their (identical) ideas by satirical sets, as A Rake’s Progress, 1735 … Ridinger built on the – especially suitable to him (that is, so he himself, ‘since the hoary times of the ancient ages’) – tradition of the animal fable ”

(Stefan Morét, Ridinger Catalog Darmstadt, 1999, page 96).

Beyond that at the same time also, creating a new image type, leaving behind once more tradition and field. For, so Ulrike Bodemann in Metzner-Raabe,

“ No  similarities  to  fable  illustrations  known  hitherto .

Enormous image sizes filled almost entirely by the representation of a central factor of the fable tale. Surroundings mostly dense, natural wood .”

And Regine Timm, ibid., vol. I, p. 171 :

“ In his large plates Ridinger … sometimes has included vegetable growth or rocks, too, dominantly in his illustrations indeed, but without decorative intention. The plants and rocks mean the thicket, the deserted loneliness of the forest, in which the strange tales among the animals happen. ”

The set consists of 20 plates, of which Johann Elias, however, has published only the first sixteen. Presumably by stylistic scruple. For with the last four, etched/engraved only by his eldest, Martin Elias, and published posthumously, he gives up the superabundance of the previous, his moreover only newly worked fable conception, in favour of a now also for himself thoroughly newly, sovereignly formulated large flat clearness with which to grapple with he obviously has shied at the end though. And where to follow him was impossible for Thienemann, too, still one hundred years later (“have less artistic value, but are nevertheless estimable, and their rarity is to be regretted”). What here, however, is regarded as a remarkably advanced artistic expressiveness.

Culminating  just  in  the  fascination

to  have  created  not  only  a  new  fable  image ,

but  cultivated  this , once  more  in  itself , to  a  new  level .

Comparable in this connection, as quoted repeatedly by Ridinger, it may be pointed out to Watteau and here to his “Party in the Open/Park” in Berlin, on which Pierre Rosenberg notes: “… the Berlin painting is

an  evidence  that  the  artist  wished  to  reinvent  himself

by  creation  of  a  new  type  of  composition …”

(Exhibition Catalogue Watteau, Washington/Paris/Berlin 1984/85, p. 415).

Ridinger’s fable image then also a highly momentous milestone within the “basic corpus of about 900 editions of illustrated fable books” up to Chagall’s Lafontaine folio with its 100 etchings worked 200 years later as downright a glaring light for the immortality of the fable illustration.

That Ridinger had conceived his set originally substantially more comprehensively is evidenced by his preparatory drawing to the 20th fable inscribed by him “Fab 31” traded here, that to the 19th inscribed “Fabel 29.” (Weigel, 1869, no. 384), and the one known to Thienemann numbered “30”, yet remained unused like further unnumbered ones.

The practically inevitable great rarity of the the four supplementary sheets known to literature since Thienemann’s statement of 1856: they “make themselves very scarce, are already not to be found in some older editions, and have been left out entirely in the latest, what is to be regretted though” (p. 151).

Accordingly then also the 1889 catalog of the Coppenrath Collection on the 20-sheet copy: “Fine main set … Rare”. And in 1900 Helbing qualified in his 1554-item Ridinger catalog (XXXIV): “The last (4) numbers are extremely rare”. And while he owned beside a complete copy multiple single prints of the first sixteen except for 12 & 13, so of the final four plates only 17 & 19 in one additional copy each. On the market till today then almost only the 16-sheet basic set, too.

The different printing states of the title, documenting the repeated editions, besides most beautiful proof of the success of the work, which obviously did reach its particular target group, the youth.

Offer no. 12,511 / EUR  946. / export price EUR  899. (c. US$ 980.) + shipping

His  owls

you  will  meet  then  at  niemeyer’s  soon  once  more

when at null o’clock of the new year the  Eagle  Owl  as Bird of the Year lands in the center of public interest and so then here, too, is greeted and presented by  Aha  Page.  Per

AHA! Theme January 2005


“ (after postal problems with the delivery) I have now received the package. thank you for your perseverance (to find the parcel again) in this matter. Warm Regards … ”

(Mr. L. T., October 31, 2012)